Alaska Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Spatial Analyst for Alaska Resources of Concern

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 7, Anchorage Alaska

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background: The Fellow selected for this position will be in beautiful Anchorage, Alaska, surrounded by the Chugach Mountains and at the head of the Cook Inlet. The Fellow will work at Alaska’s Regional Office as a member of the Inventory and Monitory Branch (I&M) which works with all 16 National Wildlife Refuges throughout Alaska.

All Alaska National Wildlife Refuges adhere to the Refuge Improvement Act and The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), and are charged with maintaining Biological Diversity, Integrity and Environmental Health across 76 million acres. The I&M program is responsible for developing plans based on Resources of Concern (ROCs) for all Alaskan Refuges by 2023. During this process it is important to have accurate, up to date, species occurrence data to use in spatial models of wildlife response to habitat change. Conservation efforts for ROCs can be guided by species distribution models base on species occurrence data and associated habitat. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with Alaska Regional staff to standardize data and convert to digital records as needed. Additionally, the Fellow will create a database in ArcGIS with species occurrence records for Priority Resources of Concerns (pROC) located on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges. Throughout the process, the Fellow will develop a data management protocol for the ArcGIS database using the Alaska Region Interim Data Management User Guide.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Geographic Information Sciences, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Working knowledge and experience with ArcGIS.

Desired Characteristics: Strong work ethic, organized, self-motivated, technical writing skills, and interest in data analysis.

Invasive Mussel Detectors of Alaska

Project Type:  This is a field project, not telework eligible.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background: Who wants to spend the summer outside on the lakes and streams of Southcentral Alaska helping to protect these places?  If you are, then read on.  The Alaska Region of the US Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking a motivated and resourceful individual to implement our newly developed invasive species early detection framework for Southcentral Alaska; the primary focus area being the Anchorage Municipality and invasive mussels.  Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to Alaska’s natural environment and our way of life.  Detecting infestations early on is key to having a chance of eradicating the species before it significantly impacts its new environment and responding while it is still relatively low in cost.  Bolstering our collaborative early detection efforts in Alaska is a priority for the Alaska Region, the Department of Interior, and the Arctic Council.  

Project Duties: The Fellow will be based out of the Alaska Regional Office in Anchorage and work closely with our Conservation Genetics Lab as part of our invasive species team and will have ample opportunities to connect with staff from the National Wildlife Refuge Program, Fisheries and Aquatic Conservation Program. The individual will also work closely with our many partners, gaining an in-depth view into the diversity of the agencies and Alaska’s people and its natural treasures.   The Fellow’s primary duties will include: 1) gaining awareness of invasive species issues in Alaska; 2) finalizing a prioritized list of waterbodies to conduct surveys for invasive and native mussels; 3) conducting field surveys and laboratory work to look for invasive mussels and help the Region verify environmental DNA (eDNA) markers for invasive mussels; 4) identify and estimate abundance of invasive mussels captured in field collections; 5) write a summary report of initial findings with suggestions on how to improve the project for full implementation across a larger landscape; 6) develop and provide a presentation on the work. Come learn about Alaska’s rich natural resources and the cultures that depend on them while making a difference in preserving them for everyone to enjoy.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year or more of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: A valid driver’s license; Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs.

Desired Characteristics: Experience keying out invertebrates, mussels, plants; Basic understanding of genetic analyses; Interpersonal communication; Cross-cultural communication; Partnership building; Project management experience; Teamwork; Technical writing.

Regional Landscape Conservation Tools Serving Alaska

Project Type:  This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background:  Come learn about Alaska’s rich natural resources and cultures that depend on them while making a difference in preserving them for everyone to enjoy. The rapid warming of the earth’s atmosphere poses historic challenges for the National Wildlife Refuge System in Alaska. This project is motivated by the need for a better understanding of how Alaska’s National Wildlife Refuges are changing in response to climate change and disturbance. This project seeks to gather information on how climate shifts will affect fish and wildlife on Refuges. Relevant and timely synthesis of climate information and creation of spatial data products will assist managers in prioritizing adaptation strategies. The specific project objectives are to apply spatial analysis skills to spatial climate data and conduct basic summary statistics in ArcGIS to measure the distribution of spatial features and reveal pattern and relationships. The Fellow will be based in Anchorage, Alaska at the Regional Office.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with the National Wildlife Refuge System, Division of Natural Resources staff in creating maps and writing locally relevant climate change narratives that will inform future refuge planning. The Fellow will use narrative techniques to develop clear and concise messages about landscapes in flux and display this information in an accompanying GIS story map. The Fellow will use spatial climate data to inform natural resource management and the opportunity to formally present information to Service staff in the Region. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, GIS, Spatial Analysis, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license and an ability to drive federal vehicles.

Desired Characteristics: Project management; Teamwork; Technical Writing.

Elevating Arctic Youth Voices

Project Type:  This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$3000 total)

Project Background: The Service’s Alaska Region is looking for a motivated and passionate individual to support strategic communications needs for our Arctic Youth Ambassador (AYA) Program. The AYA Program–which is administered by the Service and several nonprofit partners–brings together diverse youth from across Alaska to serve as ambassadors for their communities and country in building awareness at home and abroad about life in the Arctic and the changes and challenges facing the Arctic environment and communities. The Fellow would have the opportunity to collaborate with and learn from diverse stakeholders, including environmental NGOs, Ambassadors, international Arctic leaders, and decision makers and would also get to produce interesting and innovative communications related to Arctic issues.

This Fellow would support mission critical work of the Service and support National and Regional priorities related to diversity, building relationships and partnerships with Alaska Native and rural partners, climate change, and wildlife conservation. Candidates from Alaska, including Alaska Native youth, are encouraged to apply, as are students with an interest in the human dimensions of conservation.  

Project Duties: The Fellow would be responsible for working with AYA nonprofit partners and the AYAs to (1) develop a plan for communicating the perspectives of Ambassadors and successes of the program into the future, (2) develop and implement creative communications to market the program and elevate Ambassador voices, (3) build strategic partnerships, and (4) prepare for and launch the program’s fourth cohort.  

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: None.

Desired Characteristics: Interest in the human and cultural dimensions of conservation; interest in writing/storytelling/communicating with the public;  interpersonal communication skills; cross-cultural communications; partnership building; mentoring experience; leadership roles; teamwork; and management/facilitation.