Conservation and Restoration Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Alabama

Development of Genetics Management Plan for Alabama Pearlshell (Auburn University)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Southeast Conservation Genetics Lab, Warm Springs Fish Technology Center, Auburn University, Alabama

Housing: Supported ($2,500 Stipend; If interested, the student may be able to stay in an Auburn University dorm, within walking distance of office.)

Project Background: The Southeast Conservation Genetics Lab is part of the Warm Springs Fish Technology Center and located at Auburn University in Alabama. The lab performs genetics research on at-risk, threatened, and endangered aquatic animals to improve conservation outcomes. One species of interest is the federally endangered Alabama Pearlshell mussel. 

This species of mussel has a very restricted range and efforts are underway to improve the species recovery plan and implement captive propagation and reintroduction of the species. However, a genetics management plan is needed to generate baseline data for future monitoring and to ensure that recovery efforts decrease chances of extinction. This position is a great opportunity for students interested in mollusk conservation, genetics analyses, and working with a diverse group of biologists that want to improve Alabama Pearlshell conservation!

Project Duties: The Fellow will be expected to: 1) generate genomics data, 2) analyze data, and 3) write a genetics management plan for Alabama Pearlshell as well as meet with federal and state partners at the Alabama Ecological Services Field Office and the Alabama Aquatic Biodiversity Center to learn about mussel conservation and explain findings of genetics work. The Fellow will also receive: 

  • Training on cutting-edge genomic data generation and analyses. 
  • Networking and professional development opportunities at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery and with other summer research interns at Auburn University. 
  • An opportunity to participate in the Service’s Conservation Genetics Community of Practice, which is a nationwide group of conservation geneticists. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Computer Science (e.g., bioinformatics), or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle)

Desired Characteristics: Experience with effective interpersonal communication, project management, teamwork, leadership roles, and technical writing. Experience with molecular lab methods is a plus, but not required.

Alaska

Regional Landscape Conservation Tools Serving Alaska (Anchorage)

Project Type:  This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background:  Come learn about Alaska’s rich natural resources and cultures that depend on them while making a difference in preserving them for everyone to enjoy. The rapid warming of the earth’s atmosphere poses historic challenges for the National Wildlife Refuge System in Alaska. This project is motivated by the need for a better understanding of how Alaska’s National Wildlife Refuges are changing in response to climate change and disturbance. This project seeks to gather information on how climate shifts will affect fish and wildlife on Refuges. Relevant and timely synthesis of climate information and creation of spatial data products will assist managers in prioritizing adaptation strategies. The specific project objectives are to apply spatial analysis skills to spatial climate data and conduct basic summary statistics in ArcGIS to measure the distribution of spatial features and reveal pattern and relationships. The Fellow will be based in Anchorage, Alaska at the Regional Office.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with the National Wildlife Refuge System, Division of Natural Resources staff in creating maps and writing locally relevant climate change narratives that will inform future refuge planning. The Fellow will use narrative techniques to develop clear and concise messages about landscapes in flux and display this information in an accompanying GIS story map. The Fellow will use spatial climate data to inform natural resource management and the opportunity to formally present information to Service staff in the Region. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, GIS, Spatial Analysis, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license and an ability to drive federal vehicles.

Desired Characteristics: Project management; Teamwork; Technical Writing.

California

Western Monarch Butterfly Outreach and Restoration (Ventura)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office, Ventura, California

Housing: Supported, up to $2,000 per month will be provided for housing expenses. 

Project Type: Field project. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Project Background: This position will be part of the 2022 Kendra Chan Fellowship program, a two-phase opportunity for an emerging conservation leader to participate in the USFWS’s Directorate Fellows Program (DFP) and the ESA’s Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability (SEEDS) Program.  Phase 1 will be work as a DFP and Phase 2 involves a year of participation with the Ecological Society of America SEEDs program as a SPUR Fellow. The monarch’s phenomenal transcontinental migration inspires awe among scientists and citizens alike and unfortunately, due to habitat loss and degradation, pesticide use, and climate change, the western monarch population has declined by more than 99 percent since the 1980s. An estimated 4.5 million monarchs overwintered on the California coast in the 1980s, whereas in 2020, the population estimate for migratory overwintering monarchs was less than 2,000 butterflies. This alarming decline has prompted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) to list the western monarch butterfly as a candidate species and will evaluate the status of the species for listing in 2023. As we must all work together to save this iconic species, you too could join this conservation effort to save the western monarch butterflies! Join the Service, the National Park Service (NPS), and SAMOfund, a non-profit dedicated to protecting and facilitating appreciation of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, in their efforts to advance the conservation of the western monarch butterfly within Ventura and Los Angeles County

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) join outreach efforts to educate the public on ho w they can support the conservation of the western monarch butterfly, 2) independently developing a tracking system where the public can in data on where they planted the native milkweed and if the native milkweed survived, and 3) develop a program to provide crucial data to track the success of western monarch outreach efforts and native milkweed donation programs towards achieving western monarch butterfly conservation goals.  

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license; Fluency in Spanish.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal or Cross-Cultural communication skills; Partnership building; Public speaking; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.); Teamwork; Conflict Mgmt./Facilitation.

Conducting status assessments for threatened, endangered, or at-risk species (Carlsbad)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office, Carlsbad CA

Housing: Supported by duty station, Non-FWS housing supported with $1,000 monthly stipend

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The project will use conservation biology principles to synthesize information, identify data gaps, and develop conservation actions to support species recovery. Status reviews of listed species are required by the Endangered Species Act. Status assessments update a species’ biology and threats and recommend future research and conservation actions. The project can be conducted completely remotely or in person depending on the COVID situation and the Fellow preferences. The Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office is in coastal northern San Diego County. The office includes primarily Ecological Services and the following divisions: Coastal Programs, Partners in Fish and Wildlife, Listing and Recovery, Permits and Consultations (Section 7 and 10).

Project Duties: Working with the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office (Carlsbad, CA), the Fellow will complete assessments for two species in southern California: 1) a status assessment or conservation strategy for a listed species, and 2) a rapid assessment to assess the status and conservation needs of an at-risk species, including facilitating an expert solicitation workshop. The Fellow will present the results of both assessments to the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office. The Fellow will coordinate with researchers and State and Federal agencies to gather new information and identify important activities for conservation and recovery. With support from project supervisors, Fellow will work independently to review and synthesize new information. We emphasize developmental opportunities for Fellows to learn about the Endangered Species Act and the work of an Ecological Services Field office. For example, we encourage Fellows to network with Fish and Wildlife Service staff, participate in coordination meetings between staff biologists and partners, and attend trainings and webinars, as the project schedule permits. The project does not involve any required fieldwork, such as conducting surveys or monitoring. However, there may be opportunities for site visits to meet with land managers and species experts. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: 

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences i.e., Natural Resources Management, Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, Genetics, Microbiology, Chemistry, Land Management, Plant Science, Botany, Soil Science, Forestry, Invasive Species management, Plant Development, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: None

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Public speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, and Technical writing.

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Carlsbad)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office, Carlsbad, CA 

Housing: Supported, a $1,000 per month housing allowance will be provided to student for costs associated with housing during the Fellowship 

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process online. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct extensive literature reviews, 2) build a reference library, 3) work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, 4) compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, 4) collate conservation measures, analyze, and describe effects of project activities on each species, and 4) conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species in California, Nevada, or the Klamath Basin, and will work remotely with the Carlsbad Field Office. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review, build, and create a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species. The Fellow will learn about each species in detail while working closely with species experts, and about one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

Strategic Conservation Planning for Endangered Species Recovery (Sacramento)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ecological Services Program, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, Sacramento, California

Housing: Supported by duty station, Non-FWS housing supported with $1,000 monthly stipend

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office covers ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Great Central Valley, and the California coast and estuaries. It is a large office, made up of 75 employees focused on conserving over 100 listed and at-risk species and their habitats. The office prides itself on creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for everyone and is well-known for its conservation success through landscape-level HCPs, section 7 consultations, conservation banking, and working with others in creative ways to conserve and recover our trust species. Sacramento is a diverse community in the heart of Northern California providing vibrant city life with a variety nearby outdoor opportunity. San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite National Park, Napa Valley, and the Pacific Coast are all close by. Within a two-hour drive, you can be at the ocean or your favorite camping spot, or entertainment location. Summer months are sunny and dry, with daytime highs in the 90s and cool evenings in the 60s.

Project Duties: The Fellow will have the opportunity to develop a detailed step-by-step plan for conservation activities that will contribute to recovery of one or multiple species. The Fellow will be responsible for gathering information and working with both internal and external partners to assess the status of a threatened or endangered species and identify appropriate conservation activities. The Fellow will be expected to synthesize information into a written plan of action and present the plan to office leadership and staff. The project provides flexibility for the Fellow to utilize their unique skill set and interests while learning about multiple facets of the Endangered Species Act and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During the project, the Fellow will have the opportunity to conduct site visits with species experts and interact with Regional Office biologists. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in the Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/ Requirements: none

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, teamwork, and technical writing.

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Sacramento)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office

Housing: Supported, $3,000 Provided for Non-FWS Housing

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process on-line. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species. The Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office covers ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Great Central Valley, and the California coast and estuaries. It is a large office, made up of 75 employees focused on conserving over 100 listed and at-risk species and their habitats. The office prides itself on creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for everyone. Sacramento is a diverse community in the heart of Northern California providing vibrant city life with a variety nearby outdoor opportunity. San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite National Park, Napa Valley, and the Pacific Coast are all close by. Summer months are sunny and dry, with daytime highs in the 90s and cool evenings in the 60s.

Project Duties: To support this effort, the Fellow will: conduct extensive literature reviews and build a reference library, work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, collate conservation measures, analyze, and describe effects of project activities on each species, conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species in California, Nevada, or the Klamath Basin, and will work remotely with the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office. They will learn about each species in detail while working closely with species experts, and about one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review and writing to build a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7.

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Ventura)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office, Ventura, California

Housing: Supported, a $1,000 per month housing allowance will be provided to the student for costs associated with housing during the Fellowship 

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process online. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. The California red-legged frog is the most frequent species that is subject of section 7 consultation in our field office, and this will be one of the focal species. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species.

Project Duties: To support this effort, the Fellow will remotely join the Ventura Fish and Wildlife office to: conduct extensive literature reviews and build a reference library, work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, collate conservation measures, analyze and describe effects of project activities on each species, conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species within the Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office’s jurisdiction (California’s central coast).  The Fellow will learn about the California red-legged frog and other species in detail while working closely with species experts, while becoming familiar with one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review and writing to build a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

Kentucky

IPaC Development of Conservation Measures and Effects Pathways (Frankfort)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office, Frankfort, KY

Housing: Supported, Funding available for summer living accommodations

Project Background:   The US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Information, Planning, and Conservation decision support system (IPaC) can provide project design recommendations, collect environmental baseline information, and provide for the completion of much of the threatened and endangered Section 7 consultation process via the Internet. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Southeast Region Ecological Services Program. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct literature reviews, 2) compile conservation measures (actions that benefit or promote the recovery of listed species) for three Endangered Species Act listed species, 3) conduct an organizational review of the information, 4) enter the conservation measures into the Effects Pathway Manager, and 5) modify/update a manual for future use by other USFWS staff. The Fellow will work directly with the Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office as well as Regional Office and the Division of Environmental Review. As part of the final presentation, the Fellow will recommend improvements to the IPaC system.

Minimum Education Requirements and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: This is a remote DFP project that requires a general knowledge of wildlife ecology, the ability to conduct a literature search, and familiarity with the development/use of spreadsheets.

Desired Characteristics: A strong candidate for this position will have strong skills in interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management, leadership, teamwork, and technical writing.

Nevada

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Las Vegas)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Southern Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office, Las Vegas, Nevada

Housing: Supported, housing stipend amount dependent on documentation of actual cost of rent at remote work location ($1,000/month max)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Project Background: Development and utilization of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) web-based Information for Planning and Consultation system (IPaC) is a top priority for the Service’s Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. This project will assist the Southern Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office (SNFWO) in fully leveraging IPaC in the management of the Mojave Desert tortoise (tortoise). The tortoise’s needs, status, and threats present myriad management challenges across its range. With the anticipated growth of the human population and associated development, including renewable energy, transportation, and utilities, in southern Nevada, i.e., Las Vegas, IPaC will critically support the SNFWO’s efforts to meet its obligations under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). 

Project Duties: The Fellow will serve in a role equivalent to a SNFWO biologist to contribute meaningfully to the completion of the interoffice effort to bring IPaC features fully online for use in administering section 7 of the ESA, interagency consultations, for the tortoise. The Fellow will learn about tortoise related issues and biology and evaluate projects proposed by federal lead agencies. Completion of the project will require collaboration with Service field offices, the Regional Office, and the national IPaC team. Exposure to multiple levels of the Service will provide organizational insight while the project provides experience implementing national and regional policy and priorities at the field office level. Integrating species biology and management actions into a web-based organizational system is inherently complex. The Fellow will gain real-world experience solving complex problems that arise while aligning biology and ecology with policy and technical systems and demonstrate their ability to do so effectively within the Service. The Fellow will position themselves as an experienced user of a Service tool (IPaC) that will become increasingly relied upon for much of the work performed in ecological services offices across the country.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, geographic information sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology. The work is primarily desk-based and sedentary.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; partnership building; project management experience; public speaking; leadership roles; teamwork; technical writing; data management experience; analytical skills; comfort using virtual platforms for meetings; knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

Montana

Investigate Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail on Benton Lake NWR (Great Falls)

Project Type: This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Great Falls, Montana

Housing: Supported (Housing available at duty station, rent free)

Project Background: Benton Lake NWR is located eight miles north of Great Falls, MT, a city of 60,000 located in west central Montana at the confluence of the Missouri and Sun Rivers. The 12,383-acre Refuge was established in 1929 as a “Refuge and Breeding Ground for Birds.” The 6,000-acre main marsh has been subdivided into eight separate management units through a series of dikes and water control structures. A water delivery system was constructed in the late 1950’s which allows pumped water to reach the Refuge from Muddy Creek some 15 miles west of the Refuge. In the past twenty years, Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail, a forage species introduced from Eurasia, has become one of the dominant plant species in Refuge wetlands and continues to expand into large monotypic stands. Native species such as alkali bulrush and smartweed have been significantly reduced in the Refuge marsh units. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will investigate methods to effectively manage Garrison foxtail on the Refuge and draft management recommendations for Refuge staff. Work assignments will include: 1) create a list of refuge units prioritized by GFC abundance. 2) review current Refuge data on GCF Compile data on GCF and known control measures, 3) conduct a literature review for potential Garrison control methods and list of sources reviewed and used, and 4) summarize Technical Recommendations. The Fellow will work with Refuge staff and visit other area Refuges to discuss mitigation strategies, consult with  local Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA) and Bureau of Land Management staff, and work with biology and botany staff at local colleges and universities. At the end of the summer, the Fellow will deliver a final report and present on their work to Refuge staff and partners. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License and an ability to drive federal vehicles, Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs. required.

Desired Characteristics: Skills in: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Project Management experience, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, and Technical Writing.

Oregon

Southern Oregon and Northern California Bumble Bee Habitat Surveys: Two Positions Available (Ashland)

Location: R8: Yreka Fish & Wildlife Office, Yreka, CA, and R1: Oregon Fish & Wildlife Office, Portland, OR

Housing: Supported, up to $280/week provided for local housing in Ashland, OR

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: Widespread declines in bumble bees and other pollinators have been documented in recent decades. Southern Oregon and northern California offer extensive high-quality habitat, particularly at higher elevations, for native pollinators such as Franklin’s bumble bee, yet more surveys and thorough habitat assessments are needed. Surveys will be coordinated with other agencies and individuals including the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Arcata FWO, other researchers and surveyors, and the U.S. Geological Survey. This project is an excellent opportunity to learn about the Service’s Ecological Services programs and gather data that will be used for Species Status Assessments (SSA), recovery planning, and conservation on a landscape scale. Two Fellows will coordinate with both office locations listed above and complete all fieldwork together. The team will be based in Ashland, Oregon, a center of arts and culture nestled in a valley between rugged mountains.

Project Duties: The Fellows will systematically survey and sample known historic bumble bee locations during the FY22 field season, and a selection of highly suitable habitat sites will be developed from a digitized GIS habitat layer. The Fellows will: 1) catch and identify bumble bees, 2) gather habitat information, including the availability of floral resources throughout the growing season, and 3) collect genetic samples. Fellows will network with various partners at the yearly bumble bee Survey on Mt Ashland in July and may also participate in other fieldwork and learning opportunities with FWS employees and local partners. One Fellow will be supervised by the Oregon FWO and one Fellow will be supervised by the Yreka FWO. After data collection is complete, the Fellows will develop a written report and deliver an oral presentation to the Service and our partners sharing their results. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: 

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences (i.e., Natural Resources Mgmt., Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Enviro. Science, Land Mgmt., Plant Science, Soil Sci., Forestry, Invasive Species Mgmt., Plant Development), Geographic & Information Sciences, Geology, Spatial Analysis, Remote Sensing), or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs; Familiarity with ESRI software and apps (e.g., ArcGIS Pro and Collector) and an ability to operate a GPS unit. Fellows will be required to hike, camp, work remotely in pairs, and drive on four-wheel drive roads.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills; Partnership building; Project Mgmt. experience; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.); Teamwork; Insect identification, especially bumble bees; Plant identification and pollinator ecology; Wilderness or back-country first aid/survival skills.

Building Out a Conservation Program Explorer Tool (Portland)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1, Portland Regional Office, Portland

Housing:  Supported if needed, offsite.  If project must occur remotely due to COVID-19, Fellow will receive a reimbursement of up to $1,500.00 per month housing stipend based on submission of rental receipt during 11-week project duration.

Project Background:  As part of “America the Beautiful,” President Biden has issued a call to action that we work together to conserve, connect, and restore 30 percent of our lands and waters by 2030 for the sake of our economy, our health, and our well-being. To achieve this ambitious goal, it is critical that private and working landowners are supported in their voluntary stewardship efforts. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is committed to that support and is prepared to build on existing tools and strategies that bolster the effort. 

This project would build upon the Conservation Program Explorer (CPE), a web tool developed by the Cascades to Coast Landscape Collaborative (CCLC) for Southwest Washington (https://www.ctoclc.org/discovery-tool-purpose).  The CPE plays a vital role for conservation in the Pacific Northwest by raising awareness of available landowner incentive programs and connecting landowners to agencies and organizations that implement those programs.

Efforts are underway to expand the CPE across Oregon and the rest of Washington. The Fellow will work directly with the Office of Science Applications located in Portland, Oregon.  The Fellow will also interact with the CCLC –its senior and technical staff, its members from tribal nations, state, local and federal government, industry, NGOs, as well as private and working landowners.

Project Duties: Working in consultation with FWS and CCLC staff, the Fellow will contribute to this work by identifying, compiling, and incorporating additional conservation programs into the CPE.   The Fellow will also demonstrate the CPE to and solicit feedback from stakeholders at workshops and outreach events organized by the CCLC.  Finally, the Fellow will complete a written report and presentation for both the FWS and our partners that summarizes the conservation programs incorporated in the CPE, synthesizes stakeholder feedback, and provides recommendations for next steps in enhancing the utility of the CPE.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas:  

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education/outreach; social sciences/humanities; communications/marketing; information technology/computer science; or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements:  

The Fellow may need to drive to offsite workshops or outreach events: a valid driver’s license 

Desired Characteristics: valid driver’s license, interpersonal communication skills, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, public speaking, teamwork, conflict, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Western Bumble Bee Nest Site Monitoring (Portland)

Project Type: Field. This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1 (Pacific), FWS Region 9 Office (Legacy Region 1), Portland, Oregon

Housing: Supported, offsite or provided if possible

Project Background: Widespread declines in bumble bees and other pollinators have been documented in recent decades.  This includes the western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis), a species which has recently been petitioned for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  However, recent survey efforts have highlighted that there are still areas in Oregon where western bumble bees can consistently be found in relatively high concentrations.  This offers a unique opportunity to close a critical gap in our understanding of the life history of this species.  While western bumble bee foraging habitats have been documented, its habitat requirements for nesting remain largely unknown.

Project Duties: Throughout the FY22 field season, the Fellow will survey for western bumble bee nests at sites in Mount Hood National Forest and collect associated habitat and environmental data (e.g., substrate and distance to floral resources).  The Fellow will also monitor nest ecology to generate estimates of colony growth and senescence over the course of the summer. Survey and habitat assessment efforts will be coordinated with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation—a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service partner.  Survey protocol and bumble bee identification trainings will be provided by Xerces and FWS staff.  The information collected throughout the FY22 field season will directly inform conservation planning and recovery efforts for the western bumble bee. After data collection is complete, the Fellow will develop a written report and deliver an oral presentation to the Service and our partners sharing their results. This project is an excellent opportunity for the Fellow to learn about the Service’s Science Applications Program and gather data that will be used for Species Status Assessments (SSA), recovery planning, and conservation on a landscape scale.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors, seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; including conservation biology, wildlife biology, entomology, ecology, botany, or natural resource management; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Written and oral proficiency in English and an ability to operate a GPS unit.  Field work will occur in Mount Hood National Forest at higher elevations.  Fellows will be required to hike, have a driver’s license, and have an ability to drive on four-wheel drive roads.

Desired Characteristics: Insect identification, especially bumble bees; plant identification; an understanding of pollinator ecology; an ability to operate a GPS unit; hiking and four-wheel driving.

Mapping Pollinator Restoration Efforts in the Western States (Portland)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: FWS Region 9 Office (Legacy Region 1), Portland, Oregon

Housing: Supported if needed, offsite

Project Background: This project would compile critical information needed by State and Federal managers for pollinators petitioned for listing under the Federal Endangered Species Act: monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus plexippus), Western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis), and Suckley’s cuckoo bumble bee (Bombus suckleyi).  It is the Service’s priority to work with States to understand and address the needs of declining species, halt declines, reverse declines, and secure the long-term viability of pollinators.  

Working with the States of Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, and Utah, the Western Association of Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA), non-governmental organizations, and other federal agencies, the goal of this project is to compile, analyze, summarize, and map conservation accomplishments in a holistic way to understand what is happening at local and landscape scales. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with FWS staff to enhance the Monarch Conservation Database (MCD) by mapping the pollinator restoration projects recorded by the system.  Conservation accomplishments from the MCD, western states, NGOs, and other federal agencies will be compiled, mapped, and stored in a geodatabase developed by the Fellow.

The Fellow will work with FWS staff to incorporate the conservation accomplishments from their geodatabase into the Service’s National Bee Distribution Tool.  This tool allows users to query bee species based on attributes such as conservation status and to visualize the distribution of those species on a map.  By incorporating conservation accomplishments into the tool, users will be able to see the relation between species presence and restoration action allowing for prioritization of future conservation work. The Fellow will work directly with the Office of Science Applications located in Portland, Oregon.  The Fellow would interact regularly with state managers in 7 western states, federal land management agencies, WAFWA, and non-governmental organizations.  The Fellow will have the opportunity to present their work to both the Service and our partners. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; geographic and information sciences; information technology/computer science; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: No additional requirements.

Desired Characteristics: interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, teamwork, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Utah

Independent Utah Contaminants Resource Protection and Restoration (West Valley City)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Location: Legacy Region 6, Utah Ecological Services Field Office, West Valley City, Utah

Housing: Supported ($1,500 monthly housing stipend provided)

Project Background: The purpose of this project is to review and prioritize Utah’s Environmental Contaminants (EC) program activities and develop a strategic plan to guide program priorities for restoration of habitat for a future EC specialist.  The EC Strategic Plan will be presented to key decision makers at the Utah FO and Regional Office, as well as to partners such as Department of Interior, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Utah, and will be used to focus and monitor EC program activities going forward. The Fellow will work closely with the Utah FO EC Specialist, who will provide information and day-to-day guidance. While evaluating the office’s EC projects, the Fellow will meet and work with supervisors’ other biologists in the Utah FO, other internal partners in the Service’s Regional office and Refuges, and with external partners including the EPA, State of Utah, and non-governmental conservation organizations. Completing this project will give the Fellow a detailed understanding of the issues and priorities of the Utah FO ES program and will provide a glide path to employment in the office.

Project Duties: Starting with familiarization with the Utah Field Office’s (FO) 2019-2023 Strategic Plan and EC programs, projects and partnerships, the Fellow will inventory, and review Utah EC program activities using criteria and develop an evaluation matrix with input by the Contaminants Specialist. This evaluation will identify trust resources benefiting from restoration, species and habitats affected, partnerships involved, and desired outcomes and performance metrics. The Fellow will conduct an evaluation of the strategic importance of these efforts, using techniques such as SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats). Finally, the Fellow will synthesize this information into a Strategic Plan. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year or more of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in environmental toxicology, biological sciences, water sciences or a closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work will occur primarily in an office setting with day trips and possibly one overnight trip to view field sites.

Desired Characteristics: The selected Fellow for this project will need to possess a good understanding of ecology, wildlife science, and environmental toxicology and ecological risk assessment. Because so many of the EC issues in Utah are related to water and aquatic habitats, experience in aquatic toxicology is preferred. The Fellow will need to be able to work and manage their time independently, organize and synthesize diverse types of information, think creatively about evaluation and analysis methods, and produce high quality written products and presentations.

Telework

Measuring impact of Service international Species Conservation

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA. Supervisor is based in Region 7, Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The USFWS International Affairs Program coordinates domestic and international efforts to protect, restore, and enhance the world’s diverse wildlife and their habitats with a focus on species of international concern. Through the Species Programs, we work with partners in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and other parts of the world to help conserve and manage these animals. Our programs have tested monitoring and evaluation practices to incorporate into our grant-making and decision-making processes for international financial assistance. Programs have new reporting responsibilities following US Congressional legislation enacted in 2016 for the monitoring and evaluation of foreign assistance, as well as 2018 legislation and guidelines on the use of evidence and data in government programs. 

Project Duties:  The major goal of the DFP project is to assist in the next phase of incorporating new practices, compilation of data from key partners and landscapes, and preliminary analysis and presentation of key findings and messages. The Fellow will create the following deliverables include: (1) compilation of key data, including past USFWS funding history, for at least 100 international wildlife strongholds(est. 1500 grants awarded by USFWS international species programs) for the USFWS Division of International Conservation species programs (e.g., African elephant, rhinos, tigers); (2) systematic review of 2022 requests for USFWS funding to document history of past support, major interventions to conserve target wildlife species, cross-referenced with a global library of effectiveness and evidence. Additional products and collaborations are possible, contingent on skills, creativity, and interest, including assistance on a contract with the Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation. Professional development may include online networking opportunities with the conservation evidence community and international partners in wildlife conservation, collaboration with USFWS conservation staff, and hands-on training and application of innovative techniques to document conservation impact and evidence of effectiveness of USFWS efforts to conserve foreign species.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate students who have completed at least their first year or more of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and are pursuing a degree in the biological or social sciences, communications, evaluation, or closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: (1) Proficiency in Excel, including data entry and functions, organization & presentation; (2) capable and responsible to appropriately handle sensitive information; and (3) telework-ready including regular access to functional internet and Microsoft Office.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management experience, teamwork, technical writing, evaluation, data management.

CITES CoP19 Preparation Assistance

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: This is an opportunity for a Directorate Fellow to learn about wildlife trade under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) through assistance in the preparation for the CITES Nineteenth Conference of Parties (CoP19) in November 2022. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, International Affairs Program is the lead agency for implementing CITES in the United States.  CITES is an international agreement, which regulates international trade in more than 35,000 wild animal and plant species, including their parts, products, and derivatives. U.S. engagement with other CITES Parties (potentially 182 countries) is required to allow the United States Government to meet our obligations under the treaty and further the interests of the U.S. We are a major importer and exporter of CITES-listed animals and plants. Species protected by CITES are included in one of three appendices, according to the degree of protection they need: Appendix I includes species threatened with extinction and provides the greatest level of protection, including restrictions on commercial trade. Appendix II includes species that may become so without trade regulations to ensure trade is legal and sustainable. Appendix III includes species protected by at least one country that needs assistance from other Parties to monitor its international trade. 

Project Duties: The Division of Scientific Authority (DSA) invites a Fellow to use their scientific and conservation biology expertise and communication skills to evaluate species against the CITES biological and trade criteria for inclusion of taxa in the CITES Appendices, prepare species proposals for the inclusion, reclassification, and removal of species in the CITES Appendices. The Fellow will 1) draft and develop U.S. submissions, 2) evaluate other countries’ species proposals, and 3) prepare U.S negotiating positions and documents in preparation for CoP19.  The Fellow will provide policy and technical support for CITES activities of DSA with an opportunity for networking in the international arena.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is a pursuing degree in biological sciences, education, outreach, or closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A. 

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Public speaking, Teamwork, Technical Writing.

Realizing America the Beautiful – A Bold Conservation Initiative

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: In January 2022, the Biden-Harris Administration set a national goal of conserving or restoring at least 30% of America’s lands and waters by 2030. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is joining with other federal agencies in supporting a 10-year, locally led campaign called “America the Beautiful” to help our nation achieve this goal. To meet this momentous opportunity, the Service built a diverse team of dedicated staff across the agency to map the path forward on immediate tasks, identify additional actions, and track our progress. Individual teams work with the Directorate and other Service leadership teams, relevant Service groups such as the national climate team, and with outside entities such as the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and non-federal partners. This DFP project will support the team focused on results and measuring the progress of the America the Beautiful initiative within the agency. This “Results” team will not only map a path forward on key deliverables specified in the Administration’s preliminary report, but also contribute more broadly on how progress will be meaningfully tracked. The Results team works with additional teams specializing in early focal areas, including the creation of more outdoor opportunities in nature-deprived communities, support for tribally led conservation, and more, in their efforts to meet the goals and spirit of the America the Beautiful campaign. This is an unparalleled opportunity for professional development, networking, national influence, and working alongside leadership. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will survey and catalog 100 USFWS projects that are contributing to the campaign’s goals and communicating the science of conservation behind the projects. Join the team to help the Service fulfill the promise of our nation’s first-ever national conservation goal! DFP Fellow tasks and duties during the project will include supporting the team focused on results and measuring the progress of the America the Beautiful initiative within the agency, including efforts to review the condition of fish and wildlife habitats and populations.  The DFP will track and monitor progress on other emphasis areas, such as creation of more outdoor opportunities in nature-deprived communities and tribally-led conservation initiatives. By the end of the Fellowship, the Fellow will have 1) developed and delivered at least one outreach tool to communicate the science of conservation underlying a subset of the 100 America the Beautiful projects surveyed by the Fellow and 2) finalized a spreadsheet and text summary of the campaigns results and key messages.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in the Biological Sciences, Education/Outreach, Social Sciences/Humanities, GIS, Communications/Marketing, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: (1) Proficiency in Excel, including data entry and functions, organization & presentation; (2) Interest and/or experience in communication and science communication products.

Desired Characteristics: interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, leadership roles, teamwork, technical writing, and data management.

Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDA) Activities + Contribution to Service Goals

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location:  Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Gulf Restoration Office; Fairhope, Alabama

Housing: Not Supported 

Project Background: The Deepwater Horizon Gulf Restoration Office (GRO) is in Fairhope, Alabama, approximately 20 miles east of Mobile, Alabama and 30 miles north of Gulf Shores, Alabama. The GRO was established after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill to identify and assess the extent of the injury to fish, wildlife, and other natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico under the Services’ Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) program. The GRO works with co-trustees and partners to restore species and habitats impacted by a variety of NRDAR cases, including DWH. 

This project would serve to document the contribution of NRDAR restoration to Service goals, with the intent of aiding future restoration planning, and other program management needs such as informing listing decisions and recovery planning efforts.

Project Duties: The project goals include the Fellow gathering NRDAR case data to assess contribution to priority species and habitats, recreational opportunities, and Tribal engagement from restoration work completed in the Southeast Region by utilizing qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques to produce a technical report and story maps. The technical report, along with a presentation, will be delivered to GRO leadership and staff, with the potential to present to co-trustees and partners. 

The Fellow will work closely with both internal and external stakeholders, including individuals in multiple organizational levels within the Services, co-trustees and other partners (i.e., local and state agencies, non-profit organizations) associated with Southeastern NRDAR projects.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities, Geographic and Information Sciences, Physical Sciences (i.e., toxicology, contaminants) or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License, GIS certification or equivalent training.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, teamwork, technical writing.

Characterizing Risk Associated with Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDA) Hazards to Regional Priority Species (Identification of Threatened, At-risk and Priority Species in the Southeast)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Gulf Restoration Office; Fairhope, Alabama

Housing: Not Supported 

Project Background: The Deepwater Horizon Gulf Restoration Office (GRO) is in Fairhope, Alabama, approximately 20 miles east of Mobile, Alabama and 30 miles north of Gulf Shores, Alabama. The GRO was established after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill to identify and assess the extent of the injury to fish, wildlife, and other natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico under the Service’s Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) program. 

The GRO works with co-trustees and partners to restore the species and habitats that have been impacted by a variety of NRDAR cases, including DWH. The information from this project will build upon a former DFP project and will further help to identify areas where listed, at-risk, and regional priority species within the Southeast Region are most susceptible to threats of oil and hazardous substances. This information in turn can be utilized to inform future restoration planning to reduce risks to these species. In addition, this information may be used to aid recovery actions for listed species and conservation efforts for at-risk species. 

Project Duties: The project goals include gathering additional geospatial data on the presence of oil or hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants on the landscape in relation to listed, at-risk, and regional priority list species within the Southeast Region to further develop and refine the risk analysis and interactive map to be used in future restoration planning efforts. The interactive map, along with a presentation, will be delivered to GRO leadership and staff and possibly other partners.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences or geographic and information sciences or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle), GIS certification or equivalent training.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, teamwork, technical writing.

Re-design and Implementation of Advanced Applications for Conservation of Listed Species

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Atlanta Regional Office

Housing: Not Supported

Project Background: Ecological Services in the Southeast Region in Atlanta, GA, is looking for an individual with a dual interest in conservation and information technology to design and implement advanced applications program. The Southeast Region offers a high-energy, welcoming environment that embraces innovation and values the contributions of all – particularly those with fresh perspectives on old problems.  Opportunities for personal and professional growth abound, and in this position, the Fellow will learn and exercise critical skills in negotiation, conflict resolution, and strategic thinking while having a ton of fun. This position is considered developmental and represents a novel – yet needed – expertise that we are looking to strengthen within our program.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with a broad swath of staff at all levels of the program (and beyond) to develop critical information tools that support regional workforce planning efforts and the alignment of recovery actions for endangered and threatened species. The Fellow will assist in the development of a Communication Plan for the Landscape Recovery tool and present it to the team for feedback. Specific Duties/Tasks include: 1) Work with staff from Ecological Services and Science Applications (and other programs, as appropriate) to identify available data and work plans, tracking and reporting needs, and other requirements of the workload database; 2) expand and re-design of the Landscape Recovery Tool to complete existing modules and develop data for other locations, and 3) attend Ecological Services workforce planning meetings, project leader meetings, and others as appropriate.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree with demonstrated expertise in the Biological Sciences, Geographic and Information Sciences, and Information Technology/Computer Science or a closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Some knowledge of or proficiency in Microsoft Power BI

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, project management, teamwork, Conflict Resolution/Facilitation, Creativity, and an Openness to Learn!