Digital Media, Communications and Database Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Alaska

Spatial Analyst for Alaska Resources of Concern (Anchorage)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 7, Anchorage Alaska

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background: The Fellow selected for this position will be in beautiful Anchorage, Alaska, surrounded by the Chugach Mountains and at the head of the Cook Inlet. The Fellow will work at Alaska’s Regional Office as a member of the Inventory and Monitory Branch (I&M) which works with all 16 National Wildlife Refuges throughout Alaska.

All Alaska National Wildlife Refuges adhere to the Refuge Improvement Act and The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), and are charged with maintaining Biological Diversity, Integrity and Environmental Health across 76 million acres. The I&M program is responsible for developing plans based on Resources of Concern (ROCs) for all Alaskan Refuges by 2023. During this process it is important to have accurate, up to date, species occurrence data to use in spatial models of wildlife response to habitat change. Conservation efforts for ROCs can be guided by species distribution models base on species occurrence data and associated habitat. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with Alaska Regional staff to standardize data and convert to digital records as needed. Additionally, the Fellow will create a database in ArcGIS with species occurrence records for Priority Resources of Concerns (pROC) located on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges. Throughout the process, the Fellow will develop a data management protocol for the ArcGIS database using the Alaska Region Interim Data Management User Guide.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Geographic Information Sciences, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Working knowledge and experience with ArcGIS.

Desired Characteristics: Strong work ethic, organized, self-motivated, technical writing skills, and interest in data analysis.

California

 IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Carlsbad)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office, Carlsbad, CA 

Housing: Supported, a $1,000 per month housing allowance will be provided to student for costs associated with housing during the Fellowship 

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process online. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct extensive literature reviews, 2) build a reference library, 3) work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, 4) compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, 4) collate conservation measures, analyze, and describe effects of project activities on each species, and 4) conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species in California, Nevada, or the Klamath Basin, and will work remotely with the Carlsbad Field Office. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review, build, and create a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species. The Fellow will learn about each species in detail while working closely with species experts, and about one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Sacramento)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office

Housing: Supported, $3,000 Provided for Non-FWS Housing

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process on-line. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species. The Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office covers ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Great Central Valley, and the California coast and estuaries. It is a large office, made up of 75 employees focused on conserving over 100 listed and at-risk species and their habitats. The office prides itself on creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for everyone. Sacramento is a diverse community in the heart of Northern California providing vibrant city life with a variety nearby outdoor opportunity. San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite National Park, Napa Valley, and the Pacific Coast are all close by. Summer months are sunny and dry, with daytime highs in the 90s and cool evenings in the 60s.

Project Duties: To support this effort, the Fellow will: conduct extensive literature reviews and build a reference library, work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, collate conservation measures, analyze, and describe effects of project activities on each species, conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species in California, Nevada, or the Klamath Basin, and will work remotely with the Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office. They will learn about each species in detail while working closely with species experts, and about one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review and writing to build a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7.

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Ventura)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office, Ventura, California

Housing: Supported, a $1,000 per month housing allowance will be provided to the student for costs associated with housing during the Fellowship 

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Project Background: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) system delivers important information about threatened and endangered species to the USFWS’s public consultation partners and provides essential services for them to complete much of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) section 7 consultation process online. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. The California red-legged frog is the most frequent species that is subject of section 7 consultation in our field office, and this will be one of the focal species. This critically important computer-only work supports the conservation of threatened and endangered species.

Project Duties: To support this effort, the Fellow will remotely join the Ventura Fish and Wildlife office to: conduct extensive literature reviews and build a reference library, work closely with our lead species’ biologists and other experts, compile life history data such as life stages and resource needs, collate conservation measures, analyze and describe effects of project activities on each species, conduct reviews of the information, and objectively annotate and enter this data into the USFWS’s Effect Pathway Manager database. The Fellow will do this for one to three ESA-listed species within the Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office’s jurisdiction (California’s central coast).  The Fellow will learn about the California red-legged frog and other species in detail while working closely with species experts, while becoming familiar with one of the important processes of the ESA, Interagency Consultation. Additionally, the Fellow may do similar document review and writing to build a Determination Key for one or more species, agencies, or project types that will assist the public with evaluating consultation projects under a programmatic framework. The Fellow will give a final presentation of their work to the Regional and Field Offices. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Public Speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

Florida

National Wildlife Refuge System Virtual Outdoor Adventure Programs (St. Marks)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership 

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, St. Marks, Florida

Housing: Supported (shared bunkhouse or shared double-wide trailer at duty station rent-free)

Project Background: St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is looking for an enthusiastic professional with an interest in advancing their career goals in environmental education, conservation, and even digital media production. The St. Marks NWR is in northern Florida’s Big Bend Region, approximately 20 miles south of Tallahassee, Florida. This 80,000-acre refuge supports a complex array of habitats, ranging from coastal saltwater marshes to xeric upland pine forests. With the onset of COVID-19, refuges and hatcheries realized the need to adapt to provide virtual programming now and in the future.  

Project Duties: The Fellow will be tasked with creating 2-3 virtual environmental education programs that will align with the FWS mission and the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) Guideline’s for Excellence while meeting state and national education standards. To accompany the virtual programs, the Fellow will create promotional products and a written report to outline correlations between the virtual programs and educational standards. These virtual programs will be used not only locally but offered to FWS sites throughout the nation, providing the next generation an opportunity to connect to nature and give them an awareness that they may not already have that will help to create future stewards of our lands. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; English, editing writing and Media or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: 1) Must have valid driver’s license, must be comfortable working outdoors in the Florida heat, alongside biting insects and venomous snakes in wet or dry conditions. Must be able to follow directions and complete appointed tasks in a timely manner; Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, and possess digital media production and editing skills, i.e., (premiere pro, iMovie, InDesign, photoshop, Canva)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, public speaking, leadership roles, teamwork, hardworking, independent, and positive attitude.

Massachusetts

Compiling Continental Insect Population and Composition Data (part of larger project on aerial insectivore bird declines) (Hadley)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 5, North Atlantic-Appalachian Region, USFWS Regional Office, Hadley, MA

Housing: Supported, up to $1500/month stipend available

Project Background: We are seeking a curious, self-motivated, organized, and hard-working undergraduate or graduate student with interests and experience in population ecology, entomology, physiology, biological conservation, and/or data science to join a team of researchers working on conservation efforts for aerial insectivore migratory bird species. This ecologically- and economically important guild including swallows, martins, swifts, flycatchers, and nightjars feed primarily on insects and have experienced some of the largest population declines among birds in North America. The overall goal of this project is to help determine linkages among changes in insect abundance and quality and observed macro-scale declines in aerial insectivores. This Directorate Fellows Program experience is designed to provide unique professional development opportunities over an 11-week period where Fellows will 1) engage with peers within their cohort and other student interns, 2) collaborate with USFWS scientists and partners (e.g., EPA, academic institutions) via regular meetings at the regional office in Hadley, MA and/or remotely via periodic project-related meetings, 3) present project findings and deliverables to USFWS staff, and 4) be involved as a key contributor and co-author on any forthcoming manuscripts, reports, or presentations related to the broader project that will provide important insight in to the long-term conservation of aerial insectivorous migratory birds.

Project Duties: The Directorate Fellow will contribute to this project by searching for, acquiring, curating, and managing disparate data sets containing information on insect abundance and population trend dynamics, and insect nutritional and energy composition. These data (and associated metadata) will be organized and standardized in preparation for inclusion in subsequent analyses to test hypotheses linking food availability and quality with population dynamics of aerial insectivore species. The Fellow will gain experience in data management, development of tools such as data dictionary, and data management plans, as well as have autonomy to develop data sharing agreements (where applicable). 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree such as Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing;) or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: Demonstrable skills in data management and wrangling using open-source tools (i.e., R and Python) are preferred. We welcome candidates across disciplines with interests in data science and management to apply.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal Communication, Project Management Experience, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Experience using open-source tools such as R, R markdown, and R shiny are a plus!

Minnesota

Building a Better Visitor Services Framework (Bloomington)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location:  Legacy Region 3, Great Lakes Region, Regional Office in Bloomington, Minnesota

Housing: Supported – $1,000.00 per month; will assist in locating local housing

Project Background:  Since its establishment, the National Wildlife Refuge System has worked strategically and collaboratively to conserve and protect fish, wildlife, and habitat for the benefit of the American people. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and refuges within the Midwest Region (Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Iowa) are looking to support those efforts by creating and crafting meaningful messaging that reflects the mission of the agency and its work to connect with the needs of a changing society. Join us in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and help lay groundwork for the future of conservation interpretation.

Project Duties: Help us strengthen interpretation and public engagement within the Refuge System to create a connected conservation constituency! The Fellow will: 1) develop station specific interpretive thematic matrices for four stations in Region 3 to be used as a model for other stations of similar habitat or purpose (e.g. prairie, wetlands, river, islands, urban, wilderness, etc.), 2) develop and articulate the target audience needs for interpretive programming for each station, 3) develop an outdoor interpretive media plan based on the theme matrix and target audience for each station, and 4) develop and deliver a presentation to Service staff and relevant partners on findings and recommendations. The Fellow will get the full picture of the USFWS agency by visiting and networking with staff from field stations, the regional office, and headquarters, showcase your leadership and facilitation skills, and build your resume and future career. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Education/Outreach, Social Sciences/Humanities, Communications/Marketing or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements:  Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, cross-cultural communication skills, project management experience, public speaking skills, leadership roles, conflict management skills, meeting facilitation skills, interpretation, and interpretive writing familiarity.

Mississippi

Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex LiDAR Fuels Monitoring: 2 Positions Available (Gautier)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Gautier, MS

Housing: Supported (Housing will be provided off-site)

Project Background: The LiDAR Project at the Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex will integrate the latest forest vegetation surveying and monitoring technology. Working as a team, two Fellows will use terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based forest vegetation surveying/monitoring to gather data to inform active management on refuges, specifically fuel loading changes over time with respect to wildland fire, forestry, and botany. 

Project Duties: The project and its data collection will be conducted at multiple FWS locations! At the start their Fellowship, Fellows will train with the staff at Tall Timbers Research Station in Tallahassee, Florida, where instruction on the protocol and use of the terrestrial LIDAR to survey the vegetation (fuel) will be provided by the Tall Timbers and USFWS staff. Then, Fellows will gather data with the terrestrial LIDAR at the Gulf Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Mississippi, adjusting the protocol for the National Wildlife Refuge System needs, direction, and policy. At the end of the Fellowship, the Fellows will return to the LIDAR data at the Tall Timbers Research Station for post processing of the LiDAR data, and finally end the Fellowship by spending a week in the spectacular City of Atlanta, Georgia, where Fellow will present their work and products to USFWS fire, forestry, and inventory and monitoring staff.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: 1) Need to have a valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle) 2) Must be familiar with developing forest or biological survey protocols (such as timber cruising). 3) Must be able to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment. 4) Familiarity with developing forest or biological survey methods and protocols (such as timber cruising) is desired. Course work in 1) Geospatial Information Science area (ARCGIS/GPS) Spatial Analysis of Natural Resources/Geomatics, 2) Ecology of Natural Resources/General Ecology, 3) Forest Mensuration/Resource Inventory/Forest or Biological Surveying, 4) Forest Mgmt. /Wildlife Mgmt., 5) Soils and Hydrology, and 6) Dendrology are helpful.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, teamwork, technical writing.

GIS Modeling for Waterfowl Habitat (Natchez)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge, Natchez, MS

Housing: Supported (Rent-free housing at Duty Station)

Project Background: St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge is located along the Mississippi River just south of Natchez, Mississippi. It is well known for the thousands of wading birds, waterfowl, and forest birds, which utilize the dense flooded areas, swamps, bottomland forests, and uplands. The project will assist refuge management in planning actions to optimize waterfowl and/or waterbird habitat provision, within the context of a dynamic alluvial floodplain. The Fellow will model energetic carrying capacity to help Refuge management to better understand factors influencing its ability to support waterfowl/waterbird goals and objectives. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will organize and synthesize refuge GIS data into a single geodatabase and model and/or analyze refuge management actions on waterfowl habitat provision. The Fellow will also produce a report/feasibility study for future management actions to optimize waterfowl and/or waterbird habitat provision on the Refuge. 

This project is excellent for improving skills in GIS and experience in planning natural resources and wildlife habitat management.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Geographic Information Sciences, Natural Resources Management, Biological sciences, or closely related field

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment.

Desired Characteristics: Project Management experience; Technical Writing; Other: GIS (e.g., ArcMap, ArcGIS Pro).

New Hampshire

Dwarf wedgemussel occupancy and eDNA in the Northeast, geospatial data/database management (Concord)

Project Type: This is a telework only project. The Fellow will not report to a duty station.

Location:  Legacy Region 5, North Atlantic-Appalachian Region, New England Field Office, Concord, NH

Housing:  Supported, up to $1500/month stipend available

Project Background:  The New England Field Office (NEFO) is in Concord, NH.  We primarily work in 5 New England States and coordinate with state wildlife agencies, environmental groups, and other Service field offices.  This project supports three US Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) priorities:  Recovering listed species, Supporting our Workforce, and Strategic Conservation.  The project will implement a recommended action in the species’ 2019 5-year review, provide the best available information on distribution of the species and eDNA data, and inform landscape-scale management and conservation. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will update and expand a geospatial database on the distribution and abundance of the dwarf wedgemussel (DWM) in the Northeast, synthesize environmental DNA (eDNA) survey data, and create an eDNA geospatial database.

  • Task 1:  Identify, collect, organize field survey reports.  Deliverables:  Develop and populate a folder for reports.  Report out to affected field offices.
  • Task 2:  Identify relevant parameters for the database; populate database.  Deliverable:  Database of survey data.  
  • Task 3:  Convert survey database to geospatial format; create a map for presentation.  Deliverable:  Virtual presentation; folder for GIS files.
  • Task 4:  Identify, collect, organize eDNA reports.  Deliverables:  SharePoint folder for reports 
  • Task 5:  Identify relevant database parameters; populate database.  Deliverable:  Database of eDNA data.  
  • Task 6:  Convert eDNA database to geospatial format; create map for presentation.  Deliverable:  Present geodatabase; GIS folder on SharePoint.

The Fellow will (1) attend training on IT security, ethics, scientific integrity, etc. critical to the credibility of a federal biologist; (2) partner with Service biologists and other stakeholders; and (3) can attend meetings, site visits, and/or job shadows to explore other Service programs.  Many opportunities are available remotely, but some depend on remote access.  The Region typically hosts several Fellows each year.  The NEFO Fellow should network with other Fellows for support and shared experience. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological/environmental sciences, geographic information sciences, or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: Primary working conditions will be office-like.  Computer use and high-speed internet connection required.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Teamwork, Technical writing.

New Mexico

Establishment and Development of Accessibility Tools for Southwest Refuges (Albuquerque)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 2, Southwest Regional Office, National Wildlife Refuge System – Albuquerque, NM

Housing: $750/month housing stipend 

Project Background: To ensure that National Wildlife Refuges and public lands remain accessible and enjoyable to all, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service should maintain full adherence to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) of 1968.  Within Conserving the Future, one of the visions states, “Refuges are welcoming, safe and accessible for visitors, with a variety of ways to enjoy, learn about, appreciate and help conserve America’s wildlife.” In addition, this project supports the Department of Interior priority of centering equity and environmental justice efforts to communities who have traditionally been excluded from federal lands and conservation efforts, including individuals with disabilities. Based out of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico, the National Wildlife Refuge System Program’s Divisions of Visitor Services and Budget/Infrastructure Management are looking to hire an Accessibility Fellow through the Directorate Resource Assistance Fellowship Program. 

Project Duties

The Fellow will: 1) collect weekly salinities data and establish databases on both Anahuac and McFaddin NWRs by gathering samples via airboats and other modes of transport, 2) analyze long-term salinity trends in relation to sea-level rise, tropical cyclone events, major rainfall events, management in collaboration with FWS statisticians, 3) work directly or remotely with Anahuac and McFaddin biologists to gather and organize long-term salinity data bases in Excel for each refuge, and 4) draw conclusions, forecast predictions, compose a report, and present results to biologists, maintenance staff, and refuge. The Fellow will then develop a Standard Operating Procedures, an accessibility inventory and audit, and training and compliance tools for FWS Field Stations to successfully navigate and comply with federal law and improve equitable access. Working out of the Regional Office, the Fellow will have an opportunity to explore and experience many facets of potential careers within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. With the chance to job shadow federal employees from different programs and operations, the Fellow will have a comprehensive view of federal employment and career paths within the agency.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in engineering; architecture; urban or city planning; biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: NoneDesired Characteristics: Interpersonal communications, project management experience, leadership roles, teamwork, conflict, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Assessment of pollinator presence at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex (Watrous)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Southwest Region, Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge – Watrous, NM 

Housing: Supported, Bunkhouse at Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge 

Project Background: New Mexico is one of the most diverse states in terms of pollinators with over 1,000 species of native bees and over 350 species of butterflies. However, pollinator data is significantly lacking in Northern New Mexico, especially at the Northern New Mexico National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Grassland health and management is a biological priority for all three refuges in the complex. Pollinator populations are in decline due to habitat loss, fragmentation, and invasive species. Assessments of pollinator status and health remain a national priority, as documented cases of species loss continue to accrue globally. It is critical to expand Federal efforts and take new steps to reverse pollinator losses and help restore populations to healthy levels.

Science Applications USFWS Legacy Region 2 has identified the critical need to monitor pollinator populations across the Southwest refuges. This project will assist with the national pollinator team to develop FWS pollinator databases, standard protocols, and citizen science programs while creating baseline inventories at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex. 

This project takes place at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex, which includes the Las Vegas, Maxwell, and Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuges in Northeastern New Mexico. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will complete surveys, curate insect samples and assist with developing standard protocols in collaboration with USFWS staff, New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU) researchers and private partners. Fellows will also shadow refuge managers, biologists, maintenance workers, New Mexico Invasive Species Strike Team, and visitor service managers at the complex. NMHU and the complex collaborate on research projects and Fellows will be able to assist professors and students.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education and outreach, geographic information sciences, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs., and Ability and willingness to live in a remote camp for weeks at a time.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; Cross-Cultural communication skills; Partnership building; Management/Facilitation; Public speaking; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.) Teamwork; and Technical Writing.

New York

Live Evidence Coordinator- Turtle Fellow (Valley Stream)

Project type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location:  This is project is based out of Region 5, Valley Stream Office of Law Enforcement, Valley Stream, NY.

Housing: Supported (monthly or lump sum provided by duty station in addition to stipend).

Project Background: This project will support the fight against global wildlife trafficking of US native turtles. Through collaboration and creative problem solving, the Fellow will improve conservation outcomes for seized, smuggled turtles, while helping OLE establish standard operating procedures and solidifying our partnerships with AZA institutions and other FWS divisions. The Fellow will work with or at various duty stations in Region 5. Some travel may be required (if in-person work is possible). 

Project Duties: The Fellow will create a contact list (rolodex) for long-term care and housing of seized turtles and other seized live animals. The Fellow will develop SOPs for shorter term care and housing. The Fellow will also organize and schedule safety training for field staff, to be provided by existing partners. The Fellow will develop a database for seized turtles, funding obligations, and timeframes. The Fellow will become an active member of the At-Risk Turtle Team. The Fellow will have the opportunity to meet and collaborate with leaders in multiple Service Divisions, AZA partners, the Region 5 Office of Law Enforcement Management Team, and work alongside Inspectors and Special Agenda. The Fellow will receive mentoring from the Supervisory, Inspectors, and members of the At-Risk Turtle Team. The project will culminate in the Fellow presenting a self-generated presentation to the above groups. 

Minimum Education and Desired Degree Areas:  Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, geographic and information sciences, law enforcement/criminal justice, communications/marketing, information technology/computer science, or other related fields.

Working Conditions and Requirements:  Valid driver’s license, Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs.

Desired Characteristics:  Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Public speaking, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, Conflict, Technical Writing.

Nevada

IPaC Species Data Entry in the Pacific Southwest Region (Las Vegas)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Southern Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office, Las Vegas, Nevada

Housing: Supported, housing stipend amount dependent on documentation of actual cost of rent at remote work location ($1,000/month max)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Project Background: Development and utilization of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) web-based Information for Planning and Consultation system (IPaC) is a top priority for the Service’s Pacific Southwest Endangered Species Program. This project will assist the Southern Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office (SNFWO) in fully leveraging IPaC in the management of the Mojave Desert tortoise (tortoise). The tortoise’s needs, status, and threats present myriad management challenges across its range. With the anticipated growth of the human population and associated development, including renewable energy, transportation, and utilities, in southern Nevada, i.e., Las Vegas, IPaC will critically support the SNFWO’s efforts to meet its obligations under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). 

Project Duties: The Fellow will serve in a role equivalent to a SNFWO biologist to contribute meaningfully to the completion of the interoffice effort to bring IPaC features fully online for use in administering section 7 of the ESA, interagency consultations, for the tortoise. The Fellow will learn about tortoise related issues and biology and evaluate projects proposed by federal lead agencies. Completion of the project will require collaboration with Service field offices, the Regional Office, and the national IPaC team. Exposure to multiple levels of the Service will provide organizational insight while the project provides experience implementing national and regional policy and priorities at the field office level. Integrating species biology and management actions into a web-based organizational system is inherently complex. The Fellow will gain real-world experience solving complex problems that arise while aligning biology and ecology with policy and technical systems and demonstrate their ability to do so effectively within the Service. The Fellow will position themselves as an experienced user of a Service tool (IPaC) that will become increasingly relied upon for much of the work performed in ecological services offices across the country.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, geographic information sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Work independently and with a team exceptionally well. Ability to read and objectively extract pertinent data from scientific documents. Document all work in detail. Communicate effectively and tactfully. Strong ability to summarize/assimilate information into a usable work product. Familiarity with wildlife ecology. The work is primarily desk-based and sedentary.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; partnership building; project management experience; public speaking; leadership roles; teamwork; technical writing; data management experience; analytical skills; comfort using virtual platforms for meetings; knowledge of ESA section 7, project types and activities.

Oregon

Ankeny Hill Nature Center Environmental Education Specialist (Benton County)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1, Pacific Northwest

Housing:  William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge has housing available to the student.  If the project must be done remotely, up to $1,500.00 will be available to support the Fellow’s housing.

Project Background: The Ankeny Nature Center (AHNC) serves as a launching pad to exploration, investigation, and experience at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, one of the three refuges that make up the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (WVNWRC). Creating a space to connect our community to nature is what the Ankeny Hill Nature Center (AHNC) is all about. Salem Audubon Society, US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Friends of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge (The Partnership) united in 2016 to connect people to nature through this dedicated space at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. We want to make the AHNC a resource for the mid-Willamette Valley, serving an estimated 135,000 people annually, and reach make the AHNC inclusive and accessible. We want to be an asset to our Latino community, which is a growing 28% of Marion County, therefore our website, signage, and monthly preschool programs need to be bilingual. Our goals for this community resource: environmental education opportunities; hands-on nature experiences; fostering stewardship of natural resources; providing space for other providers to present their own nature/ecology/wildlife programs. Annually, the desired outcomes for the AHNC include at least 20 classroom/virtual programs a year; 10 bilingual programs (Eng. & Spanish); and 50 outdoor education programs that take advantage of the nature trails and Nature Explore Area. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1)  Develop and complete a draft bilingual, field trip curricular plan that contributes to some of the educational themes of the Ankeny Hill Nature Center (AHNC) and meets National Generation Science Standards for that grade level and is in coordination with the Visitor Services Manager (VSM) and educators, 2) design and implement a workshop for teachers and volunteers that covers the details and how-to of the developed bilingual field trip for the AHNC, and 3) plan, coordinate and execute the workshop with the VSM, OSU Extension and other partners in order to offer the workshop (virtually or in-person) with the possibility of continuing education credits for educators, and 4) present the AHNC environmental education products to the Salem Audubon board or their education committee and other stakeholders. Additional Projects to enhance AHNC program include but are not limited to: a) submit a white paper on the usefulness and applicability of Project Based Learning at the AHNC, and b) serve as a liaison to the Design Management Team (DMT) on various projects and report out monthly on items pertaining to the AHNC, as a part of the DMT.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: undergraduate rising seniors or graduate student who are pursuing a degree or advanced degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing) or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Driver’s license required and an ability to drive federal vehicles. Bilingual, native Spanish speaker preferred.

Desired Characteristics: Some outreach, interpretation and/or environmental education experience is a plus. Creative, open-minded, and collaborative individual that is a self-starter!

Building Out a Conservation Program Explorer Tool (Portland)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1, Portland Regional Office, Portland

Housing:  Supported if needed, offsite.  If project must occur remotely due to COVID-19, Fellow will receive a reimbursement of up to $1,500.00 per month housing stipend based on submission of rental receipt during 11-week project duration.

Project Background: As part of “America the Beautiful,” President Biden has issued a call to action that we work together to conserve, connect, and restore 30 percent of our lands and waters by 2030 for the sake of our economy, our health, and our well-being. To achieve this ambitious goal, it is critical that private and working landowners are supported in their voluntary stewardship efforts. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is committed to that support and is prepared to build on existing tools and strategies that bolster the effort. 

This project would build upon the Conservation Program Explorer (CPE), a web tool developed by the Cascades to Coast Landscape Collaborative (CCLC) for Southwest Washington (https://www.ctoclc.org/discovery-tool-purpose).  The CPE plays a vital role for conservation in the Pacific Northwest by raising awareness of available landowner incentive programs and connecting landowners to agencies and organizations that implement those programs.

Efforts are underway to expand the CPE across Oregon and the rest of Washington. The Fellow will work directly with the Office of Science Applications located in Portland, Oregon.  The Fellow will also interact with the CCLC –its senior and technical staff, its members from tribal nations, state, local and federal government, industry, NGOs, as well as private and working landowners.

Project Duties: Working in consultation with FWS and CCLC staff, the Fellow will contribute to this work by identifying, compiling, and incorporating additional conservation programs into the CPE.   The Fellow will also demonstrate the CPE to and solicit feedback from stakeholders at workshops and outreach events organized by the CCLC.  Finally, the Fellow will complete a written report and presentation for both the FWS and our partners that summarizes the conservation programs incorporated in the CPE, synthesizes stakeholder feedback, and provides recommendations for next steps in enhancing the utility of the CPE.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas:  

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education/outreach; social sciences/humanities; communications/marketing; information technology/computer science; or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements:  

The Fellow may need to drive to offsite workshops or outreach events: a valid driver’s license 

Desired Characteristics: valid driver’s license, interpersonal communication skills, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, public speaking, teamwork, conflict, management/facilitation, technical writing

Mapping Pollinator Restoration Efforts in the Western States (Portland)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: FWS Region 9 Office (Legacy Region 1), Portland, Oregon

Housing: Supported if needed, offsite

Project Background: This project would compile critical information needed by State and Federal managers for pollinators petitioned for listing under the Federal Endangered Species Act: monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus plexippus), Western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis), and Suckley’s cuckoo bumble bee (Bombus suckleyi).  It is the Service’s priority to work with States to understand and address the needs of declining species, halt declines, reverse declines, and secure the long-term viability of pollinators.  

Working with the States of Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, and Utah, the Western Association of Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA), non-governmental organizations, and other federal agencies, the goal of this project is to compile, analyze, summarize, and map conservation accomplishments in a holistic way to understand what is happening at local and landscape scales. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with FWS staff to enhance the Monarch Conservation Database (MCD) by mapping the pollinator restoration projects recorded by the system.  Conservation accomplishments from the MCD, western states, NGOs, and other federal agencies will be compiled, mapped, and stored in a geodatabase developed by the Fellow.

The Fellow will work with FWS staff to incorporate the conservation accomplishments from their geodatabase into the Service’s National Bee Distribution Tool.  This tool allows users to query bee species based on attributes such as conservation status and to visualize the distribution of those species on a map.  By incorporating conservation accomplishments into the tool, users will be able to see the relation between species presence and restoration action allowing for prioritization of future conservation work. The Fellow will work directly with the Office of Science Applications located in Portland, Oregon.  The Fellow would interact regularly with state managers in 7 western states, federal land management agencies, WAFWA, and non-governmental organizations.  The Fellow will have the opportunity to present their work to both the Service and our partners. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; geographic and information sciences; information technology/computer science; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: No additional requirements.

Desired Characteristics: interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, teamwork, management/facilitation, technical writing

Rhode Island

Technical Assistance for Offshore Motus Network (Charlestown)

Project Type: This is a telework only project. The Fellow will not report to a duty station.

Location: Legacy Region 5, North Atlantic Appalachian Region, 5 North East, Rhode Island Field Office, Charlestown, RI USA

Housing: Supported, up to $1500/month stipend available

Project Background: This DFP project would provide technical assistance to a collaborative effort led by the USFWS Migratory Bird program to develop standardized protocols and study design tools for using automated radio telemetry (Motus) to monitor movements of birds and bats at offshore wind energy areas throughout the Atlantic. This ‘Offshore Motus’ project includes working with industry partners to deploy Motus stations on offshore wind turbines and buoys. The DFP project would provide analytical and technical support for the Offshore Motus project, including developing tools to calibrate, manage, visualize, and summarize data from Motus stations. Results from this study will improve information used in offshore wind energy assessments, including estimates of potential collision risk of birds with offshore wind turbines. The ideal applicant will be able to apply existing analytical skills to bring a high degree of autonomy and personal responsibility to the project.

Project Duties: Tasks of this effort may include:

1) Via e-mail, phone, and teleconferencing, providing technical assistance to offshore Motus network partners to implement calibration protocols at their sites. This task will provide the Fellow opportunities to gain exposure to multiple stakeholders from the public and private sectors.

2) Assist Offshore Motus project co-leads from the Service and NGOs to continue to develop data management and visualization tools for calibration data using Python, R, and R-Shiny. The Fellow will develop independence and autonomy by applying technical skills to develop and improve methods for collecting, analyzing, and summarizing calibration data. 

3) Conduct outreach to internal and external stakeholders involved with offshore wind energy and the broader Motus network on the calibration protocols, tools, and applications. Outreach activities could include delivering a virtual webinar on calibration methods, workflow, and tools. This will allow the Fellow to present the deliverables or work products to key decision makers and navigate organizational levels through interactions with FWS partners both within programs and across programs.

The primary deliverable of this effort is a summary report describing the calibration protocols, best practices, and methodological trade-offs (e.g., test tag on mast versus kite). Summary report could include analysis of existing calibration data (e.g., collected at Block Island Wind Farm) as a case study. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in the biological sciences; geographic and information sciences or closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: Coding skills in Python, R, and experience with development of R-Shiny applications.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, teamwork, technical writing.

Tennessee

Wetland Geodatabase for Aquatic Invasive Species (Stanton)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership 

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge, Stanton, TN

Housing: Supported (housing provided rent-free at duty station)

Project Background: Hatchie NWR has ~10,000 acres of forested wetlands with mature hardwood forests, dozens of lakes, and impoundments with active management for waterfowl and other birds. Invasive species are a common problem for managers on the refuge and represent a significant risk for threatened and endangered species, species of conservation concern, and focal species for management. Tracking invasive species is challenging because population can be dynamic and control efforts continually eradicate or reduce local populations. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work on the following projects: 1) modify and update a wetland geodatabase created in 2021 with spatial distribution and key descriptive metrics (e.g., acres, density, persistence) for common aquatic invasive species (e.g., Alternanthera philoxeroides, Hydrilla verticillata) to assist with control, resource allocation, risk assessment, and monitoring to support adaptive resource management on National Wildlife Refuges, 2) will compile existing spatial datasets and modify the existing spatial wetland database to add information on aquatic invasive species occurrence, spatial distribution, density, persistence (response to previous control efforts) and other metrics, 3) use existing energetic constants to estimate energetic carrying capacity for waterfowl and other waterbirds in areas where the invasive species occur, and 4) complete a final report, finalize the updated geodatabase, and potentially publish their results after the findings are presented to Hatchie NWR staff and stakeholders.

This work will be done in collaboration with the regional invasive species coordinator, regional waterfowl ecologist, regional Inventory & Monitoring Branch staff, and NWR managers and biologists and will include the regional Invasive Species Framework and Management Plan. 

The Fellow will have considerable decision space in designing attributes and modifying the spatial database. This project will require leadership, decision making skills, and high levels of communication with regional and local NWR staff.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least the first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD) and is pursuing a degree in a natural resource-related field with coursework or certifications in geographic information systems and/or spatial data analysis, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements:  If working on site, Fellow must have a driver’s license and be able to travel from lodging location to office location daily. If working remotely – Fellow will need access to an environment conducive to telework (i.e., reliable, high-speed internet, etc.)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal skills, project management experience, teamwork experience, leadership experience, partnership building experience, and technical writing skills.

Texas

Coastal Prairie Monitoring in South Texas (Los Fresnos)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 2, Southwest Region, Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge – Los Fresnos, TX

Housing: Housing supported at living quarters, Laguna Atascosa NWR

Project Background: The Gulf Restoration Program seeks a self-motivated and independent Fellow to develop photo monitoring protocols for coastal prairie habitat management and to assist in previous photo monitoring data compilation at the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. Tasks will include the development of a coastal prairie photo monitoring protocol; the evaluation and assessment of previously established sites along with the development of new photo points; and the evaluation of previous photo documentation in comparison with current condition of prairie management units to collect monitoring data. 

This project has real world, immediate applicability in supporting specific Service priorities involving the management and recovery of migratory and grassland bird species and federally listed threatened and endangered species that inhabit South Texas Coastal Prairie. This project will provide on the job experience in coastal prairie habitat restoration and enhancement techniques and the importance of monitoring protocols for adaptive management strategies and how findings can be incorporated into the decision-making process. 

Project Duties: This Fellow will be responsible for three main deliverables: 1) a coastal prairie photo monitoring protocol, 2) a database that includes previous monitoring data, photos, management history, and a data review procedure and 3) a presentation that summarizes the coastal prairie monitoring protocol, the database, and the results of the most recent monitoring efforts. Tasks and Duties include: 1) develop a coastal prairie photo monitoring protocol for south Texas, 2) determine the existing photo points and establish additional photo points in the prairies, 3) monitor current condition of prairie management units through photo documentation, and 4) gather and compile existing monitoring and prairie habitat management data.  Join us to work with multiple programs within The Service, engage with external conservation partners, and gain experience in developing and delivering an informative presentation for varied audiences!

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing;) or other closely related field 

Working Conditions: Must have a valid driver’s license, can walk/hike over uneven terrain carrying equipment and be able to lift/carry 50 pounds. Extremely hot and humid working environment. May encounter venomous snake and biting and stinging insects.

Desired Characteristics: Self-motivated, able to work independently, Interpersonal communications skills, cross-cultural communications skills, teamwork, technical writing, and experience building partnerships.

Washington

Washington Fish and Wildlife Office Multi-Species Priority Habitat Mapping for Climate Resiliency (Lacey)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location: Fellow will work from their home location but will receive a housing stipend from Legacy Region 1, Washington Fish and Wildlife Office, Lacey, Washington.

Housing: Project is remote. Fellow will receive a reimbursement of up to $1,500.00 per month housing stipend based on submission of rental receipt during 11-week project duration.

Project Background: This project is a remote Fellowship working with the Central Washington Field Office (in Wenatchee, WA) and the Washington Fish and Wildlife Office (in Lacey, WA). The Multi-species Priority Habitat Mapping for Climate Resiliency Project for the East slope Cascades and Westside Forests Ecosystem Zones will identify and map areas that should be prioritized for recovery and restoration for multiple species.  These two zones encompass multiple forested areas and watersheds from alpine headwaters down to the lower river systems and are home to several high priority species and their habitats including bull trout, northern spotted owl, Canada lynx, Mt. Rainier White-tailed ptarmigan, White bark pine and many others. This mapping project will identify refugia areas that will help maintain and recover multiple species in the future under climate change. 

Project Duties: The Fellow tasks and duties during the project will include coordinating weekly meetings with an advisory team of species and issue leads and the WFWO GIS technical lead to develop a multi-species integrated mapping tool.

The Fellow will produce (1) a compilation of existing priority habitat mapping data for single species (2) An integrated mapping tool for prioritizing refugia areas for conservation of multiple species in a future under climate change for the East slope Cascades and Westside Forests Ecosystem Zones in Washington, and (3) will produce a summary document with methodology and rationale used for the mapping tool, and needs and data gaps for future climate resiliency priority area mapping efforts for multiple species. Job shadowing opportunities from the field office to regional level will be plentiful. Multiple high priority species in the WFWO offices have monthly, range-wide species and planning coordination meetings with internal and external partners. There will be opportunities to attend and participate in these coordination meetings, as well as shadow technical, issue and species leads.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate – second-year MS student with advanced GIS mapping and modeling skills, with a major in either the Geographic Information Sciences and/or the Biological Sciences (including, but not limited to Natural Resource Management, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, or Conservation Biology).

Working Conditions/Requirements: The project is remote and requires access to high-speed internet. Applicant must be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, statistical software (such as R) and ArcMap/ArcPro (GIS). Must be organized, detail oriented, be able to communicate effectively in oral and written forms and be able to work independently with minimal supervision.

Desired Characteristics: Knowledge of natural resource and wildlife management including the habitat needs of plants, fish, and wildlife. Experience with and knowledge of habitat suitability modeling, etc. is desired. Strong candidates for this project include interpersonal communication skills, partnership building skills, public speaking experience, leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), teamwork skills, and technical writing skills.

Digital Media Outreach Specialist – Leavenworth Fisheries Complex (Leavenworth)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1, Leavenworth Fisheries Complex, Leavenworth, WA. (If project needs to be remote due to COVID -19, Fellow will work from home and receive a housing stipend.)

Housing: None provided, but a housing stipend to cover rent. If project must become remote, the Fellow may receive a monthly housing stipend reimbursement (up to $1,500.00 per month).

Project Background: The Leavenworth Fisheries Complex (LFC) has 100,000 visitors a year at the Leavenworth, Entiat, and Winthrop national fish hatcheries.  That is a startling number for our small facilities.  Our challenge is to provide the best possible experience for our visitors – and that begins off-site.  With effective digital outreach, we can invite visitors to come here, pique their interest, and prepare them for what they might see and do.  We can also serve “virtual visitors” who may not be able to travel to our hatcheries, or enter buildings, due to local and regional travel and health restrictions. Paving the way for in-person and virtual visits, we can deliver important, relevant conservation messages targeted audiences, such as English- and Spanish-speaking audiences. Creating an appropriate and interesting digital outreach package requires time, specific interests, motivation, and specialized skills. This is an ideal job and unique opportunity for a DFP Fellow to fulfill a critical need for Region 1’s Fish and Aquatic Conservation (FAC) program and the LFC in FY2022.  The FAC program nationally has produced an excellent communication strategy.  Since the start of the Covid pandemic, virtual communications have become even more critical. Based on a document from our leadership, the LFC aims to follow the goals outlined: 1) increase awareness of FAC work and its relevance to target audiences, 2) create consistent messages while working collaboratively to increase participation in angling, outdoor recreation, and conservation, and 3) sync with overall Service and DOI goals.

Project Duties: The Fellow will be producing digital media that help deliver our messages to audiences we target. Among these audiences is our Spanish-speaking community, which makes up 60% of the City of Wenatchee (largest city near the LFC).  The Fellow will work with the Visitor Services Manager to assemble a specific list of digital outreach projects (such as a virtual 3-D tour of the hatchery visitor center and buildings) and will rank the projects in order of priority. The Fellow will work with partners to produce Spanish-language versions of each digital outreach project, as appropriate. The Fellow will plan an achievable timeline to complete each project, starting with the top priority. Finally, the Fellow will design and outline a project continuation plan for future staff members and volunteers to complete post Fellowship. We expect some digital outreach projects to be fully completed by the end of the Fellowship and other assignments to reach varying stages of design and development for future work.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and senior who are pursuing a degree in education and outreach, social sciences, history/archives/museum studies, humanities, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: If onsite/in-person, a valid driver’s license is required.

Desired Characteristics: Written and oral proficiency in Spanish as well as English, strong communication skills, technical proficiency in working with digital media, and experience working on teams are desired.

Telework

CITES CoP19 Preparation Assistance

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: This is an opportunity for a Directorate Fellow to learn about wildlife trade under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) through assistance in the preparation for the CITES Nineteenth Conference of Parties (CoP19) in November 2022. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, International Affairs Program is the lead agency for implementing CITES in the United States.  CITES is an international agreement, which regulates international trade in more than 35,000 wild animal and plant species, including their parts, products, and derivatives. U.S. engagement with other CITES Parties (potentially 182 countries) is required to allow the United States Government to meet our obligations under the treaty and further the interests of the U.S. We are a major importer and exporter of CITES-listed animals and plants. Species protected by CITES are included in one of three appendices, according to the degree of protection they need: Appendix I includes species threatened with extinction and provides the greatest level of protection, including restrictions on commercial trade. Appendix II includes species that may become so without trade regulations to ensure trade is legal and sustainable. Appendix III includes species protected by at least one country that needs assistance from other Parties to monitor its international trade. 

Project Duties: The Division of Scientific Authority (DSA) invites a Fellow to use their scientific and conservation biology expertise and communication skills to evaluate species against the CITES biological and trade criteria for inclusion of taxa in the CITES Appendices, prepare species proposals for the inclusion, reclassification, and removal of species in the CITES Appendices. The Fellow will 1) draft and develop U.S. submissions, 2) evaluate other countries’ species proposals, and 3) prepare U.S negotiating positions and documents in preparation for CoP19.  The Fellow will provide policy and technical support for CITES activities of DSA with an opportunity for networking in the international arena.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is a pursuing degree in biological sciences, education, outreach, or closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A. 

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Public speaking, Teamwork, Technical Writing.

Preparations for CITES 19th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP19)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The USFWS International Affairs Program coordinates domestic and international efforts to protect, restore, and enhance the world’s diverse wildlife and their habitats with a focus on species of international concern. Through the International Affairs and Branch of Wildlife Trade and Conservation we provide important support to CITES and the upcoming Conference of Parties. The Fellow for this project would have the opportunity to work on supporting this Conference and, by so doing, helping protect international wildlife resources. Their position papers, research, and communication tools would be utilized at the highest level of USFWS leadership including during the Conference of the Parties.

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) assist in with the preparation and development of position papers in response to recommendations of the CITES Secretariat on various resolution and decisions agenda items or researching information to prepare those proposals prepared by the United States, 2) develop spreadsheets for timelines on task needed in preparation for the CoP, and 3) participating in meeting with interagency officials, as well as domestic and international stakeholders including countries and NGO participants. The DFP will be able to engage with domestic and internationals partners and stakeholders. The Fellow will deliver Federal Registrar text and draft briefing and outreach materials for CoP19. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, law enforcement/criminal justice, communications/marketing, or closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, public speaking, teamwork, technical writing.

Oregon Spotted Frog Rangewide Monitoring Protocol and Database Development

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location:  Fellow will work from their home location but will receive a housing stipend from Legacy Region 1, Bend Field Office, Bend, Oregon.

Housing: Project is remote. Fellow will receive a reimbursement of up to $1,500.00 per month housing stipend based on submission of rental receipt during 11-week project duration.

Project Background: Oregon spotted frog, Rana pretiosa, (OSF) was listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2014, with final critical habitat designated in 2016.). Regrettably with the current drought and other stressors, the OSF continues to see population declines across its range. The actual current distribution has some uncertainty however due to a lack of consistent monitoring effort and varying protocols being used for detection. The draft Recovery Plan, draft Species Biological Report, and draft Recovery Implementation Strategy are currently being developed and in manager review (Summer 2022). The primary objective for this project is to develop a rangewide protocol, electronic datasheet, and online data-portal to aid in fully documenting the current occurrence of the OSF. The OSF is the most aquatic frog in the Pacific Northwest, requiring water for all life stages. Hydrologic changes to natural waterways over the past century contributed to its decline, resulting in being listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act in 2014. The Fellow will work with OSF experts internally and externally (USGS, OR and WA Departments of Fish and Wildlife, USFS, etc.) detailing how survey efforts are currently conducted; evaluate best practices and compile one OSF protocol for use across the range. The Fellow will develop a digital data collection platform so partners can easily input information, using a common format, into an online data-portal to compile data from across the range (Southern Oregon to British Columbia).

Project Duties: The Fellow duties would include, 1) familiarization with Oregon spotted frog species life history and collection of all egg-mass monitoring protocols being used by WDFW, USGS, and FWS; 2) coordination with OSF scientists and biologists from USGS, WDFW, and USFWS on egg-mass monitoring variables and thresholds needed in the data protocol; 3) production of range-wide egg-mass monitoring protocol based on these protocols and this coordination; 4) creation of protocol-level datasheet as an appendix to the range-wide monitoring protocol; 5) creation of electronic survey form for tablets/smartphones mirroring protocol-level datasheet; 6) coordination with OFWO GIS staff to create an online data portal for USFWS staff and partners to input annual monitoring data and spatial locations of frogs (Survey123 and/or Field Maps).  

Finally, the Fellow, with OFWO GIS staff assistance, will ensure the digital platform is set up following USFWS data standards, with safeguards in place to secure the data, while allowing for intuitive interaction with the platform by USFWS staff and partners (USGS and WDFW) to input locational and monitoring data from the developed protocol.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate level student (MS or PhD) who has completed first year with advanced GIS mapping and modeling skills, with a major in either the Geographic Information Sciences and/or the Biological Sciences (including, but not limited to Natural Resource Management, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, or Conservation Biology). Graduate degree in biological or ecological sciences. This project requires someone familiar with research monitoring design and implementation. The ideal candidate will have worked with electronic software previously and can bring that knowledge with them to improve on what FWS GIS staff have already done with other monitoring projects in the OFWO.

Working Conditions/Requirements: The Fellow will be working remotely, therefore traditional outside-of-work opportunities for mentoring may be limited. 

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, project mgmt. experience, public speaking, leadership roles, teamwork, and technical writing. Experience developing and executing a monitoring or research methodology. Experience developing and implementing a monitoring database (spreadsheet) and monitoring data sheets. Experience with monitoring data input and analysis.

Implementing a National Digital Communication (Storytelling) Framework

Project Type:  This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: USFWS is currently undergoing a massive transition in its digital technology (e.g., new website, new Intranet, new Digital Asset Management System). This project will help Service staff effectively navigate this transition to efficiently and effectively use digital tools available to enhance the agency’s brand and better connect the American people with our conservation mission and to and public lands, and will foster improved internal coordination, resulting in more effective and efficient external communication about fish, wildlife, plant, and habitat conservation. Working closely with the Service’s National Social Media Manager and National Digital Media Strategists Team, the Fellow will complete a rigorous project that enhances the Service’s brand and online presence, and will apply project management skills, problem solving abilities, and creativity to improve and enhance digital communication products and strategy. Finally, the Fellow will also network with digital media experts across the U.S., in addition to agency leadership. The Fellow’s work will ensure that the Service’s online tools, channels, platforms, and communication products meet the needs of 21st century Americans, including excellence in customer service and providing an informative, educational, and fun experience that connects people from all backgrounds and geographies with nature and opportunities to get involved.

Project Duties:  The Fellow will implement a new national editorial calendar, a national digital media content strategy and framework, develop an agency-wide communication metrics (evaluation) toolkit, identify training needs and opportunities, develop training resources and tools to be used across the agency’s digital media community, including strategies and recommendations to bring a diversity, equity, and inclusion lens to all the Service’s social media platforms, channels, and accounts. The Fellow will develop original social media posts for the agency’s national accounts (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) and creative web content/blog posts around national priorities and timely/seasonal happenings related to fish, plant, wildlife, and habitat conservation. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas:  Undergraduate rising seniors, seniors, who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Education, Outreach, Social Sciences, Policy, Social and Digital Media, Computer Science., or other closely related fields. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal or Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Project Mgmt./experience, Mentoring experience, Public speaking, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, Conflict Mgmt./ Facilitation, Technical Writing, Other: Social and digital media content production, analytics/metrics/evaluation; survey design and implementation; focus group design and implementation.

ePermits Communications Team Lead

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The 2022 DFP project introduces the Fellow to a cross-programmatic effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to modernize and build a fully electronic permit application and processing system.  The project introduces the Fellow to the new ePermits web-based permitting platform and provides the Fellow with extensive opportunities to create internal and external outreach initiatives to further the understanding of the ePermits system by both the FWS and the public.  As the ePermits Communications Team Lead, the Fellow will be the primary point of contact working in close collaboration with the ePermits cross-programmatic technical and executive teams and Accenture Federal Services to deliver communications in support of the ePermits system and its constituencies. The Fellow will work with ePermits experts to gain practical knowledge of how the FWS conserves listed species. Your project manager will provide developmental opportunities to build skills in leadership, including critical and strategic thinking, innovation, creativity, and independent work habits. The Fellow will have opportunities to network with other DFPs, staff in field offices, and other Regions to learn about diverse and exciting conservation efforts across the country. The DFP project manager will guide the Fellow through this 11-week project to ensure you gain a strong foundation in how the FWS works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Project Duties:   The Fellow will develop a portfolio that includes responsibilities and tasks, including: 1) implementation of communications strategy for ePermits to meet communication audiences including permitting stakeholders, internal stakeholders, OMB, Congress, and DOI leadership; 2) design and support external stakeholder listening sessions; 3) coordinate and oversee development the and maintenance of content for ePermits, including FAQs, permit application landing pages, and knowledge articles;  4) participate in planning meetings with the ePermits Technical Team and other stakeholders within and outside of the agency; 5) organize and participate in demonstrations of the ePermits system, including internal and external stakeholders; 6) serve as the primary communications staff member liaising with the “change management” staff member working for Accenture Federal Services on tasks such as: distribution of a monthly e-newsletter to ePermits users within FWS, distribution of periodic messages to key stakeholders, organizing and developing trainings and content for FWS staff, managing the USFWS Intranet site for ePermits and design, and develop content for ‘how to’ videos produced by the National Conservation Training Center; and lead work with AFS staff to guide the development and improvements of the “user portal” and user experience for ePermits. The goal is to create a platform that is as user friendly as possible.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, communications/marketing, or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork.

USFWS Climate Change Adaptation and Communications

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: Successfully addressing climate change and other stressors that are transforming our lands and waters is the defining conservation challenge of the 21st Century. Join the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) on the national stage in working towards addressing climate change.  We’re seeking a student well versed in life sciences and communications to assist us in telling the Service story of how we are successfully adapting in the face of climate change.  The Service has developed a Climate Conservation Action Plan and you will serve an essential role in developing resources that will enable Service offices to further climate adaptation strategies across Service operations. The Fellow will work for the Division of Conservation Science and Partnerships in the Headquarters Science Applications program (SA), which emphasizes innovation and partnerships to address conservation challenges, resulting in a network of connected lands and waters that support healthy fish and wildlife populations.  In particular, SA interprets and collaborates on climate science so that the most current science and state of the art methodologies are applied to meet the urgent needs of conservation.   

Project Duties: The Fellow will assess on-the-ground climate adaptation strategies applied by various Service offices and programs and highlight case studies, detailing the environmental consequences of climate change, the species, and habitats most vulnerable to climate change effects and how they benefited from the management strategies applied. The Fellow will conduct literature reviews, interviews, and other searches to learn about the Service’s stewardship responsibilities, skills, and resources. The Fellow will compile state lists of Species of Greatest Conservation Need and identify species of common regional interest, particularly those species most vulnerable to climate change. The Fellowship will culminate, develop, and present impactful communications across a variety of mediums, highlighting the Service’s successful techniques in adapting to climate change. This multifaceted project involves networking with Service employees and programs across geographical regions as well as operational layers of the agency.  Successful completion of this project will require communications with State partners, scientists, and media experts, as well as resourceful literature and digital research, creativity, resourcefulness, and strong written and verbal communication skills. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences and humanities; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), teamwork, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Communicating the Impact of International Programs to Combat Wildlife Trafficking

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The DFP Fellow would be located 100% remote in a telework position; however, the supervisor and team sit at Headquarters in Falls Church, VA and the Fellow will be expected to engage on Eastern Standard Time. Wildlife trafficking is the second greatest threat to biodiversity after habitat destruction, affecting more than 6,000 species and valued at $72 to $216 billion each year. The United States recognizes wildlife trafficking as a serious transnational crime that threatens species and undermines U.S. priorities, including national security, human health, and the economy. The Combating Wildlife Trafficking Strategy and Partnerships (CWT) Branch in the USFWS’ International Affairs program provides technical and financial support to address threats from illegal wildlife trade. The CWT Branch recently established two programs to: 1) sponsor regional cohorts in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Master’s Course, and 2) provide financial assistance that conserve species primarily threatened by wildlife trafficking. 

Project Duties: The CWT Branch seeks a Fellow to lead the development of outreach materials to share the outcomes and impacts of these two high-profile programs with Congress, interagency partners, and international collaborators. To promote the CITES Master’s Course and Priority Species Program, the Fellow will create a communications and outreach strategy, synthesize written and graphical content, design layouts, and manage to production a suite of outreach materials (consisting of a fact sheet, social media toolkit, and booklet or blog articles) for each program. The Fellow will advance their skills in crafting compelling narratives to spotlight program successes; in cross-team collaboration while working closely with programmatic and outreach staff from the CWT Branch and Office of Outreach and Communication; and in targeting and delivering outreach to diverse audiences.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social science and outreach, law enforcement and criminal justice, communications/marketing, or other closely related fields.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Outstanding oral and written communication skills; strong graphic design skills; proficiency with the Adobe product suite including mandatory skills in Photoshop and InDesign; ability to organize, prioritize and multi-task and deliver on multiple projects; attention to detail; demonstrated ability to collaborate and work as part of a team.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; project management experience; teamwork.

GIS-based National Spill Threat Assessment

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background:  This position is a remote project based out of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters office in Falls Church, VA.  The Service works with other response agencies to minimize exposure and adverse effects to natural resources from the spill and associated response activities. Over the last two decades, the Spill program has responded to hundreds of spills to protect Service trust resources; however, data is not typically tracked in a meaningful geospatial context or with threats to Service priorities, such as endangered or at-risk species, considered. 

Project Duties: The DFP Fellow will develop a Geographic Information System (GIS) based application and online dashboard capturing spill data, species habitat ranges, DOI lands, pipelines, railways, and navigable waters to create new data layers to demonstrate spatially where spills or threats of spills overlap with potential impact to several Service priorities. This project will allow the Service Spills program to better identify risks and contingency plan for future spills. The DFP will also present a webinar demonstrating the utility of the application.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Geographic and Information Sciences, Information Technology/Computer Science, or other closely related fields.        

Working Conditions/Requirements:  ArcGIS experience.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, Partnership building, Public speaking, Leadership roles, and Teamwork.

Customer Experience Journey Mapping Liaison

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The IRTM Customer Experience (CX) program exists to create a consistent and positive experience for customers through project participation, aligned with the strategic use of tools, and to develop customer centric communications. The Fellow will have an opportunity to engage with employees in multiple areas within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Department of the Interior, and its Bureaus. Conversations will originate internally within Customer Experience and Training program, serving as the conduit for customers to reach back to IRTM. The opportunity to expand into the larger professional network will be necessitated by the need to collect knowledge and familiarity with Information Technology (IT), Administrative Operations, and FWS mission areas. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will gain experiences in communications, training development, and business analytics. Additionally, the Fellow will work with multiple programs across the Service to translate business needs and user stories into critically needed documentation and training resources by creating a Journey mapping template. Then, translate key business-oriented tasks into stories by creating 3 or more journey maps. These will reveal information that will be used to refine processes and procedures to improve the customer experience.  Additionally, the Fellow will collaborate, develop, and create weekly customer centric communications for review and distribution through email, newsletters, and SharePoint. The Fellow will attend meetings and engage with leadership within the USFWS and the Department of Interior, in support of this digital customer experience project. Using the skills and networking opportunities the Fellow will become a key part of building the customer experience journey in support of the FWS mission.  

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Communication/Outreach; Information Technology, communications/marketing, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements:  N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Public speaking, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, Management/Facilitation, Technical Writing.

Characterizing Risk Associated with Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDA) Hazards to Regional Priority Species (Identification of Threatened, At-risk and Priority Species in the Southeast)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Gulf Restoration Office; Fairhope, Alabama

Housing: Not Supported 

Project Background: The Deepwater Horizon Gulf Restoration Office (GRO) is in Fairhope, Alabama, approximately 20 miles east of Mobile, Alabama and 30 miles north of Gulf Shores, Alabama. The GRO was established after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill to identify and assess the extent of the injury to fish, wildlife, and other natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico under the Service’s Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR) program. 

The GRO works with co-trustees and partners to restore the species and habitats that have been impacted by a variety of NRDAR cases, including DWH. The information from this project will build upon a former DFP project and will further help to identify areas where listed, at-risk, and regional priority species within the Southeast Region are most susceptible to threats of oil and hazardous substances. This information in turn can be utilized to inform future restoration planning to reduce risks to these species. In addition, this information may be used to aid recovery actions for listed species and conservation efforts for at-risk species. 

Project Duties: The project goals include gathering additional geospatial data on the presence of oil or hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants on the landscape in relation to listed, at-risk, and regional priority list species within the Southeast Region to further develop and refine the risk analysis and interactive map to be used in future restoration planning efforts. The interactive map, along with a presentation, will be delivered to GRO leadership and staff and possibly other partners.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences or geographic and information sciences or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle), GIS certification or equivalent training.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, teamwork, technical writing.

Heralding the Successes of the Service – Puerto Rico!

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Atlanta Regional Office 

Housing: Not Supported

Project Background: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has a great conservation history in Puerto Rico and the time has come to begin to share our story more strategically with others. To meet this goal, we are looking for an outstanding communications student in Puerto Rico! 

In recent times, the Service has noticed an increased call to know more about what we do for the environment on the Islands of Puerto Rico and the Fellow will work to answer that call and spend their 11-week Fellowship learning, discovering, and proposing communications strategies that would work well on the islands. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct research to understand and outline communication needs for the Southeast region, 2) research specific communication needs and best practices for stakeholders and constituents in Puerto Rico, and 3) finally, propose a strategic plan or way forward which entails mapping out strategies for the Service to use to reach our audiences. 

The expectation is that the Fellow will inform the External Affairs Program about effective communications strategies to utilize on the Islands of Puerto Rico.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Fluent in Spanish

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, public speaking, and teamwork.