Education and Infrastructure Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Alaska

Elevating Arctic Youth Voices (Anchorage)

Project Type:  This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$3000 total)

Project Background: The Service’s Alaska Region is looking for a motivated and passionate individual to support strategic communications needs for our Arctic Youth Ambassador (AYA) Program. The AYA Program–which is administered by the Service and several nonprofit partners–brings together diverse youth from across Alaska to serve as ambassadors for their communities and country in building awareness at home and abroad about life in the Arctic and the changes and challenges facing the Arctic environment and communities. The Fellow would have the opportunity to collaborate with and learn from diverse stakeholders, including environmental NGOs, Ambassadors, international Arctic leaders, and decision makers and would also get to produce interesting and innovative communications related to Arctic issues.

This Fellow would support mission critical work of the Service and support National and Regional priorities related to diversity, building relationships and partnerships with Alaska Native and rural partners, climate change, and wildlife conservation. Candidates from Alaska, including Alaska Native youth, are encouraged to apply, as are students with an interest in the human dimensions of conservation.  

Project Duties: The Fellow would be responsible for working with AYA nonprofit partners and the AYAs to (1) develop a plan for communicating the perspectives of Ambassadors and successes of the program into the future, (2) develop and implement creative communications to market the program and elevate Ambassador voices, (3) build strategic partnerships, and (4) prepare for and launch the program’s fourth cohort.  

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: None.

Desired Characteristics: Interest in the human and cultural dimensions of conservation; interest in writing/storytelling/communicating with the public;  interpersonal communication skills; cross-cultural communications; partnership building; mentoring experience; leadership roles; teamwork; and management/facilitation.

California

Western Monarch Butterfly Outreach and Restoration (Ventura)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office, Ventura, California

Housing: Supported, up to $2,000 per month will be provided for housing expenses. 

Project Type: Field project. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Project Background:

This position will be part of the 2022 Kendra Chan Fellowship program, a two-phase opportunity for an emerging conservation leader to participate in the USFWS’s Directorate Fellows Program (DFP) and the ESA’s Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability (SEEDS) Program.  Phase 1 will be work as a DFP and Phase 2 involves a year of participation with the Ecological Society of America SEEDs program as a SPUR Fellow. The monarch’s phenomenal transcontinental migration inspires awe among scientists and citizens alike and unfortunately, due to habitat loss and degradation, pesticide use, and climate change, the western monarch population has declined by more than 99 percent since the 1980s. An estimated 4.5 million monarchs overwintered on the California coast in the 1980s, whereas in 2020, the population estimate for migratory overwintering monarchs was less than 2,000 butterflies. This alarming decline has prompted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) to list the western monarch butterfly as a candidate species and will evaluate the status of the species for listing in 2023. As we must all work together to save this iconic species, you too could join this conservation effort to save the western monarch butterflies! Join the Service, the National Park Service (NPS), and SAMOfund, a non-profit dedicated to protecting and facilitating appreciation of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, in their efforts to advance the conservation of the western monarch butterfly within Ventura and Los Angeles County

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) join outreach efforts to educate the public on ho w they can support the conservation of the western monarch butterfly, 2) independently developing a tracking system where the public can in data on where they planted the native milkweed and if the native milkweed survived, and 3) develop a program to provide crucial data to track the success of western monarch outreach efforts and native milkweed donation programs towards achieving western monarch butterfly conservation goals.  

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license; Fluency in Spanish.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal or Cross-Cultural communication skills; Partnership building; Public speaking; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.); Teamwork; Conflict Mgmt./Facilitation.

Florida

National Wildlife Refuge System Virtual Outdoor Adventure Programs (St. Marks)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership 

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, St. Marks, Florida

Housing: Supported (shared bunkhouse or shared double-wide trailer at duty station rent-free)

Project Background: St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is looking for an enthusiastic professional with an interest in advancing their career goals in environmental education, conservation, and even digital media production. The St. Marks NWR is in northern Florida’s Big Bend Region, approximately 20 miles south of Tallahassee, Florida. This 80,000-acre refuge supports a complex array of habitats, ranging from coastal saltwater marshes to xeric upland pine forests. With the onset of COVID-19, refuges and hatcheries realized the need to adapt to provide virtual programming now and in the future.  

Project Duties: The Fellow will be tasked with creating 2-3 virtual environmental education programs that will align with the FWS mission and the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) Guideline’s for Excellence while meeting state and national education standards. To accompany the virtual programs, the Fellow will create promotional products and a written report to outline correlations between the virtual programs and educational standards. These virtual programs will be used not only locally but offered to FWS sites throughout the nation, providing the next generation an opportunity to connect to nature and give them an awareness that they may not already have that will help to create future stewards of our lands. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing; English, editing writing and Media or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: 1) Must have valid driver’s license, must be comfortable working outdoors in the Florida heat, alongside biting insects and venomous snakes in wet or dry conditions. Must be able to follow directions and complete appointed tasks in a timely manner; Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, and possess digital media production and editing skills, i.e., (premiere pro, iMovie, InDesign, photoshop, Canva)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, public speaking, leadership roles, teamwork, hardworking, independent, and positive attitude.

Georgia

Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge Community Engagement: Redefining Our Relationship (Townsend)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex/Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge

Housing: Supported (Bunkhouse on Refuge)

Project Background: Interested in a project where natural resources and cultures clash? The history at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge – from its time as a World War II airfield to the important habitat it provides for the threatened wood stork and the direct descendants’ connection to the land – provides a myriad of challenges and opportunities. The Service is keenly focused on future engagement with the community to include them in a dialogue while working together. The community of Harris Neck and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are now working together to engage in a forward-looking perspective. The Fellow will be exposed to leadership at all levels in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the local community, and external organizations, and will gain experience in strategic thinking, leadership, and change management. The Fellow will work in a team setting, while afforded autonomy and independence. Those interested in challenge, change, conservation, and culture should apply.

Project Duties: The Fellow will assist in this change and will be involved in everything from community engagement, refuge events, community assisted cultural interpretation projects, and strategic planning. Tasks will include leading the development of a cultural/natural interpretive projects while including community members in its development. The Fellow will also plan and deliver at least one event on the refuge (can be virtual if remote work is required) such as but not limited to youth fishing days, ethno-botany tours, cultural interpretation, etc. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing major in Education/Outreach, Social Science/Humanities, or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle), Moderate Hiking

Desired Characteristics: Leadership, partnerships, collaboration, and communication.

Minnesota

Building a Better Visitor Services Framework (Bloomington)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location:  Legacy Region 3, Great Lakes Region, Regional Office in Bloomington, Minnesota

Housing: Supported – $1,000.00 per month; will assist in locating local housing

Project Background:  Since its establishment, the National Wildlife Refuge System has worked strategically and collaboratively to conserve and protect fish, wildlife, and habitat for the benefit of the American people. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and refuges within the Midwest Region (Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Iowa) are looking to support those efforts by creating and crafting meaningful messaging that reflects the mission of the agency and its work to connect with the needs of a changing society. Join us in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and help lay groundwork for the future of conservation interpretation.

Project Duties: Help us strengthen interpretation and public engagement within the Refuge System to create a connected conservation constituency! The Fellow will: 1) develop station specific interpretive thematic matrices for four stations in Region 3 to be used as a model for other stations of similar habitat or purpose (e.g. prairie, wetlands, river, islands, urban, wilderness, etc.), 2) develop and articulate the target audience needs for interpretive programming for each station, 3) develop an outdoor interpretive media plan based on the theme matrix and target audience for each station, and 4) develop and deliver a presentation to Service staff and relevant partners on findings and recommendations. The Fellow will get the full picture of the USFWS agency by visiting and networking with staff from field stations, the regional office, and headquarters, showcase your leadership and facilitation skills, and build your resume and future career. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Education/Outreach, Social Sciences/Humanities, Communications/Marketing or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements:  Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, cross-cultural communication skills, project management experience, public speaking skills, leadership roles, conflict management skills, meeting facilitation skills, interpretation, and interpretive writing familiarity.

Montana

Human-Grizzly Bear Conflict Reduction Coordinator (Montana)

Project type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location:  This is project is based out of Region 6, Billings, MT RAC Office.

Housing: Supported (one time, $3000 housing stipend).

Project Background: As a Fellow with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement in Montana you will be working with highly trained and experienced special agents and biologists with the USFWS, state conservation officers, biologists and managers, tribal conservation officers and officials, and citizen committee members to help solve a challenging problem involving human-grizzly bear conflicts. 

Project Duties: The Fellowship will provide opportunity to travel to three different states to obtain information critical to this project and interact with numerous conservation minded individuals.  The selected Fellow will: 1) work independently while reviewing critical information, 2) critically assess data, and 3) identify previously unidentified actions/causes/behaviors/circumstances and/or commonalities involved in human-grizzly bear conflicts.  The Fellow will consolidate the data and create a written recommendation report on how to appropriately address these newly identified actions/causes/behaviors/circumstances and/or commonalities to help reduce and/or eliminate future human-grizzly bear conflicts.  There will be opportunity for the Fellow to accompany USFWS agents and biologists and state and tribal conservation officers and biologists to the safe scenes where human-grizzly bear conflicts have occurred to get first-hand experience with a variety of different conflicts. The Fellow may need to be able hike while carrying heavy equipment in adverse weather conditions in remote, rugged terrain.  The project will require you to tap into critical thinking, problem solving, interpersonal skills and technical writing.  At the finish of this project, the Fellow will present their recommendations on based on their findings. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, law enforcement/criminal justice, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, communications/marketing, Geographic Information Sciences, or other related fields.

Requirements/Working Conditions:  Valid driver’s license, ability to lift/carry up to 50 pounds, ability to conduct field work potentially involving hiking and carrying equipment, ability to work in various weather conditions and stomach various degrees of animal decomposition.  Carry and deploy bear spray and be certified in basic first aid and CPR.

Desired Characteristics:  Teamwork, partnership building, interpersonal skills, cross-cultural communication and technical writing skills, public speaking, and leadership roles.

New Mexico

Environmental Education Curriculum Development for Multi-Refuge Framework (San Antonio)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 2, Southwest Region, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge – San Antonio, NM

Housing: Supported, at duty station, San Antonio, New Mexico

Project Background: In central New Mexico, two National Wildlife Refuges within Socorro County seek to collaborate in the development of a fourth grade Environmental Education framework.  This project aims to create an environmental education framework which will be used throughout Socorro County to connect fourth grade students with their local refuges: Sevilleta and Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuges. The development of approximately twelve-tiered lesson plans – both in the classroom and field trips – will help our sites share what we do and why we do it with our local community. Once implemented, these experiences will help us foster partnerships and create avenues for open communication with our neighbors. This is especially important as we navigate changes to our landscape and management decisions due to ongoing drought. 

The selected Fellow will have a variety of professional development pathways provided and will become familiar with each participating refuge. The Fellow will meet a variety of refuge staff with varying experiences and expertise from the participating field stations. Opportunities for networking with other US Fish and Wildlife Service field site staff is integrated into the resource gathering portion of the project. 

Project Duties:  The Fellow will create a fourth-grade environmental education framework and curriculum plan for participating students to foster connections using resource- and place-based techniques. The Fellow will be provided with example curriculum and meet with content experts and refuge staff from other field stations with similar environmental education models. Over eleven weeks, the Fellow will design and develop a twelve-lesson series of lesson plans which incorporates the environmental education objectives and biological priorities of Sevilleta and Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuges as well as best practices for environmental education. 

The Fellow will meet extensively with refuge staff at Bosque del Apache and Sevilleta to learn about biological and visitor services priorities, as well as the goals of the framework project. The completed fourth grade curriculum will be developed so that connections for participating students are fostered using resource- and place-based techniques. The Fellow will produce a final curricular tool that includes thoughtful steps for implementation in the upcoming academic school year and in the future. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Education/Outreach, Social Sciences/Humanities, Law Enforcement/Criminal Justice, Communications/Marketing or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license and an ability to drive federal vehicles.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, teamwork.

Oregon

Ankeny Hill Nature Center Environmental Education Specialist (Benton County)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 1, Pacific Northwest

Housing:  William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge has housing available to the student.  If the project must be done remotely, up to $1,500.00 will be available to support the Fellow’s housing.

Project Background: The Ankeny Nature Center (AHNC) serves as a launching pad to exploration, investigation, and experience at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, one of the three refuges that make up the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (WVNWRC). Creating a space to connect our community to nature is what the Ankeny Hill Nature Center (AHNC) is all about. Salem Audubon Society, US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Friends of the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge (The Partnership) united in 2016 to connect people to nature through this dedicated space at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. We want to make the AHNC a resource for the mid-Willamette Valley, serving an estimated 135,000 people annually, and reach make the AHNC inclusive and accessible. We want to be an asset to our Latino community, which is a growing 28% of Marion County, therefore our website, signage, and monthly preschool programs need to be bilingual. Our goals for this community resource: environmental education opportunities; hands-on nature experiences; fostering stewardship of natural resources; providing space for other providers to present their own nature/ecology/wildlife programs. Annually, the desired outcomes for the AHNC include at least 20 classroom/virtual programs a year; 10 bilingual programs (Eng. & Spanish); and 50 outdoor education programs that take advantage of the nature trails and Nature Explore Area. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1)  Develop and complete a draft bilingual, field trip curricular plan that contributes to some of the educational themes of the Ankeny Hill Nature Center (AHNC) and meets National Generation Science Standards for that grade level and is in coordination with the Visitor Services Manager (VSM) and educators, 2) design and implement a workshop for teachers and volunteers that covers the details and how-to of the developed bilingual field trip for the AHNC, and 3) plan, coordinate and execute the workshop with the VSM, OSU Extension and other partners in order to offer the workshop (virtually or in-person) with the possibility of continuing education credits for educators, and 4) present the AHNC environmental education products to the Salem Audubon board or their education committee and other stakeholders. Additional Projects to enhance AHNC program include but are not limited to: a) submit a white paper on the usefulness and applicability of Project Based Learning at the AHNC, and b) serve as a liaison to the Design Management Team (DMT) on various projects and report out monthly on items pertaining to the AHNC, as a part of the DMT.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: undergraduate rising seniors or graduate student who are pursuing a degree or advanced degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; communications/marketing) or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Driver’s license required and an ability to drive federal vehicles. Bilingual, native Spanish speaker preferred.Desired Characteristics: Some outreach, interpretation and/or environmental education experience is a plus. Creative, open-minded, and collaborative individual that is a self-starter!

South Dakota

Grazing Infrastructure Inventory and Needs in Western SD Complex (Columbia)

Project Type: This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Columbia, SD 

Housing: Supported (Housing available at duty station, rent free)

Project Background: We are looking for an individual with range and grazing management experience to assist with grazing projects in the Western South Dakota Complex, which consists of Sand Lake, Huron, and Lake Andes Wetland Management Districts (WMD). The individual’s home base will be Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge/WMD, but they may also work in the other districts. Many units within the complex are high priority units for waterfowl and other grassland nesting birds. Over the years, workloads have increased and the use of fire to achieve objectives has decreased, so it is imperative to use a grazing program to its fullest extent. This position provides a unique opportunity to work across multiple stations in South Dakota. Opportunities to work at and attend training at other South Dakota and North Dakota stations exists and will be taken advantage of when possible. There currently are not any range specific positions within the Prairie Pothole Region and this position has the chance to make a significant positive impact on grazing programs and habitat management within the region.

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct an inventory of grazing infrastructure on high priority units within the complex, 2) develop a list of missing or needed infrastructure for these units, 3) conduct baseline habitat monitoring on a sample of these units, and 4) provide complex staff with a document of different grazing systems and how and when to apply them. All this information is critical to ensure staff are making the best management decision about the grazing program within the Complex. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in range sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license and an ability to drive federal vehicles, ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, basic understanding of GIS and GPS.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Leadership role (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, Management/Facilitation, Technical Writing

Texas

Maintenance Professional Development Program- Strike Force DFP (Eagle Lake)

Project type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Location: Region 2, Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR, Eagle Lake, Texas.

Housing: Supported (On-site, Free).

Project Background: Spend the summer making a meaningful impact on your public lands! The US and Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking a candidate to learn the skilled trades and project management expertise required to become a maintenance professional at a National Wildlife Refuge. As part of the 11-week Directorate Fellows Program (DFP) the candidate will spend their time working alongside experienced maintenance workers and equipment operators to complete important infrastructure projects in the Southwest. We will train you on basic heavy equipment and teach you the skills needed to complete high-profile projects. This work directly impacts public access, improves our facilities, and influences wildlife habitat at our Refuges. This position is stationed at Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge near Eagle Lake, Texas. This vibrant refuge has an active youth program, dynamic maintenance projects, and is in the midst of building a new visitor center. Numerous opportunities abound at this refuge and upon completion of the DFP program the candidate will have made relationships with staff at many refuges, our regional office, and our headquarters office. The connections made through this opportunity, combined with the direct hire authority the candidate receives after successful completion of the project, will open the door to a permanent position in the Service.

Project Duties: The Fellow will complete the following during the 11-week internship: 1. Attend and pass Heavy Equipment Safety Training (HEST) for Tier 1 heavy equipment to include safety foundations, backhoe, skidsteer, and agriculture tractor certificates. 2. Gain a working knowledge of the trades needed in a maintenance role by participating in one strike force infrastructure project and one Maintenance Action Team (MAT) project. 3. Lead or co-lead a MAT or infrastructure project where they plan for equipment, labor, and supplies and develop a site safety plan. 4. Complete and present a final report of the project that includes photos, cost estimation versus actual expenses, and summary of the work done.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, construction management, project management, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license, ability to conduct fieldwork involving hiking and carrying equipment, ability to lift/carry 50 lbs. 

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), teamwork, and experience working with new and changing teams.

Telework

Assessing and facilitating FWS reduction of bird-glass collisions

Project type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location:  This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: Recent research determined that North America has lost nearly three billion birds since 1970 which motivates an organized response from the Service. Given that bird collisions with glass and towers result in fatalities of more than 1 billion birds per year in North America, the Service is taking steps to reduce those collisions. The Service recently developed, tested, and improved an online interactive spatial building survey tool allowing a rapid quantification of the Service buildings and towers and their risks to birds. To accomplish survey completion, outreach and facilitation are needed. This project offers a unique opportunity to network with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Migratory Bird Program and National Wildlife Refuge System and address bird collisions occurring at Service refuges throughout the U.S. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will be provided background on the latest science and management in bird collision prevention and familiarized with tools for assessing refuge buildings and other infrastructure for collision risk. Once equipped with the necessary knowledge and tools, the Fellow will develop outreach and educational materials to encourage employees to complete the survey at their facilities, facilitate building and tower changes and educate the public.  At the end of the 11-week project, the Fellow will present to Service staff and regional leadership about their experience and progress with addressing bird strikes at Service facilities. The Fellow will be working remotely from their desired location.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, Education/outreach, social sciences, communications/marketing, Information Technology/Computer Science, or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communications skills, partnership building, teamwork, conflict, and management/facilitation.

Regional Planning for Inclusive Natural Resource Damage Restoration Co-Design

Project Type: This is a telework only project. The Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location: North Atlantic-Appalachian Regional Office, Hadley, MA 

Housing: Not supported

Project Background: The Fellow will be tasked with developing a “Regional Plan for Inclusive Natural Resource Damage (NRD) Restoration Co-Design” for restoration with natural resource damage settlements for the Service’s North Atlantic-Appalachian Region (Northeast Region). Restoration planning work that engages the public is specified in the DOI NRDAR regulations at 43 CFR Part 11, and is a priority of the Natural Resource Trustees, including the Department of the Interior, and our co-Trustees with whom we partner in restoration work. Generally, Natural Resource Trustees hold public meetings and presentations, post information online, and distribute fact sheets and similar outreach materials as part of their restoration planning process. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will develop a strategy for public outreach and community involvement in restoration planning for the NRDAR program to enable the Trustees to engage with local communities in a meaningful way, focusing on the co-design paradigm. This Regional Plan will evaluate ways to overcome barriers to meaningful participation and prioritize opportunities for the involvement of minority, low-income, and tribal populations as appropriate early and throughout restoration planning activities. The Fellow will utilize information from the EPA’s EJScreen and the CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index to inform the Regional Plan. The Regional Plan will present options for public engagement, and strengths and weaknesses of those options, as well as an implementation guide. Such a plan for restoration planning moving forward will be sensitive to diversity, inclusive, and reflective of the ‘co-designing model’ and Human Dimensions science, all within the context of the Trustees’ legal/regulatory limitations and managing expectations. The deliverable for the work would be a “Regional Plan for Inclusive Natural Resource Damage Restoration Co-Design” that the Fellow will present to Regional and Field office staff for consideration and potential implementation. This effort will have utility and applicability to NRDAR planning efforts throughout the North Atlantic-Appalachian Region and will aid in the Service’s work to connect people with nature.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, education and outreach, social sciences, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: none specified

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; Cross-Cultural communication skills. 

Partnership building; Teamwork; Conflict; Management/Facilitation.

USFWS Climate Change Adaptation and Communications

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: Successfully addressing climate change and other stressors that are transforming our lands and waters is the defining conservation challenge of the 21st Century. Join the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) on the national stage in working towards addressing climate change.  We’re seeking a student well versed in life sciences and communications to assist us in telling the Service story of how we are successfully adapting in the face of climate change.  The Service has developed a Climate Conservation Action Plan and you will serve an essential role in developing resources that will enable Service offices to further climate adaptation strategies across Service operations. The Fellow will work for the Division of Conservation Science and Partnerships in the Headquarters Science Applications program (SA), which emphasizes innovation and partnerships to address conservation challenges, resulting in a network of connected lands and waters that support healthy fish and wildlife populations.  In particular, SA interprets and collaborates on climate science so that the most current science and state of the art methodologies are applied to meet the urgent needs of conservation.   

Project Duties: The Fellow will assess on-the-ground climate adaptation strategies applied by various Service offices and programs and highlight case studies, detailing the environmental consequences of climate change, the species, and habitats most vulnerable to climate change effects and how they benefited from the management strategies applied. The Fellow will conduct literature reviews, interviews, and other searches to learn about the Service’s stewardship responsibilities, skills, and resources. The Fellow will compile state lists of Species of Greatest Conservation Need and identify species of common regional interest, particularly those species most vulnerable to climate change. The Fellowship will culminate, develop, and present impactful communications across a variety of mediums, highlighting the Service’s successful techniques in adapting to climate change. This multifaceted project involves networking with Service employees and programs across geographical regions as well as operational layers of the agency.  Successful completion of this project will require communications with State partners, scientists, and media experts, as well as resourceful literature and digital research, creativity, resourcefulness, and strong written and verbal communication skills. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences and humanities; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing; or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), teamwork, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Communicating the Impact of International Programs to Combat Wildlife Trafficking

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The DFP Fellow would be located 100% remote in a telework position; however, the supervisor and team sit at Headquarters in Falls Church, VA and the Fellow will be expected to engage on Eastern Standard Time. Wildlife trafficking is the second greatest threat to biodiversity after habitat destruction, affecting more than 6,000 species and valued at $72 to $216 billion each year. The United States recognizes wildlife trafficking as a serious transnational crime that threatens species and undermines U.S. priorities, including national security, human health, and the economy. The Combating Wildlife Trafficking Strategy and Partnerships (CWT) Branch in the USFWS’ International Affairs program provides technical and financial support to address threats from illegal wildlife trade. The CWT Branch recently established two programs to: 1) sponsor regional cohorts in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Master’s Course, and 2) provide financial assistance that conserve species primarily threatened by wildlife trafficking. 

Project Duties: The CWT Branch seeks a Fellow to lead the development of outreach materials to share the outcomes and impacts of these two high-profile programs with Congress, interagency partners, and international collaborators. To promote the CITES Master’s Course and Priority Species Program, the Fellow will create a communications and outreach strategy, synthesize written and graphical content, design layouts, and manage to production a suite of outreach materials (consisting of a fact sheet, social media toolkit, and booklet or blog articles) for each program. The Fellow will advance their skills in crafting compelling narratives to spotlight program successes; in cross-team collaboration while working closely with programmatic and outreach staff from the CWT Branch and Office of Outreach and Communication; and in targeting and delivering outreach to diverse audiences.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences; education and outreach; social science and outreach, law enforcement and criminal justice, communications/marketing, or other closely related fields.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Outstanding oral and written communication skills; strong graphic design skills; proficiency with the Adobe product suite including mandatory skills in Photoshop and InDesign; ability to organize, prioritize and multi-task and deliver on multiple projects; attention to detail; demonstrated ability to collaborate and work as part of a team.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; project management experience; teamwork.

ePermits Communications Team Lead

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: The 2022 DFP project introduces the Fellow to a cross-programmatic effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to modernize and build a fully electronic permit application and processing system.  The project introduces the Fellow to the new ePermits web-based permitting platform and provides the Fellow with extensive opportunities to create internal and external outreach initiatives to further the understanding of the ePermits system by both the FWS and the public.  As the ePermits Communications Team Lead, the Fellow will be the primary point of contact working in close collaboration with the ePermits cross-programmatic technical and executive teams and Accenture Federal Services to deliver communications in support of the ePermits system and its constituencies. The Fellow will work with ePermits experts to gain practical knowledge of how the FWS conserves listed species. Your project manager will provide developmental opportunities to build skills in leadership, including critical and strategic thinking, innovation, creativity, and independent work habits. The Fellow will have opportunities to network with other DFPs, staff in field offices, and other Regions to learn about diverse and exciting conservation efforts across the country. The DFP project manager will guide the Fellow through this 11-week project to ensure you gain a strong foundation in how the FWS works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Project Duties:   The Fellow will develop a portfolio that includes responsibilities and tasks, including: 1) implementation of communications strategy for ePermits to meet communication audiences including permitting stakeholders, internal stakeholders, OMB, Congress, and DOI leadership; 2) design and support external stakeholder listening sessions; 3) coordinate and oversee development the and maintenance of content for ePermits, including FAQs, permit application landing pages, and knowledge articles;  4) participate in planning meetings with the ePermits Technical Team and other stakeholders within and outside of the agency; 5) organize and participate in demonstrations of the ePermits system, including internal and external stakeholders; 6) serve as the primary communications staff member liaising with the “change management” staff member working for Accenture Federal Services on tasks such as: distribution of a monthly e-newsletter to ePermits users within FWS, distribution of periodic messages to key stakeholders, organizing and developing trainings and content for FWS staff, managing the USFWS Intranet site for ePermits and design, and develop content for ‘how to’ videos produced by the National Conservation Training Center; and lead work with AFS staff to guide the development and improvements of the “user portal” and user experience for ePermits. The goal is to create a platform that is as user friendly as possible.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, communications/marketing, or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Partnership building, Project Management experience, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork.

Realizing America the Beautiful – A Bold Conservation Initiative

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station. 

Location: This is a remote project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing: Not supported (remote).

Project Background: In January 2022, the Biden-Harris Administration set a national goal of conserving or restoring at least 30% of America’s lands and waters by 2030. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is joining with other federal agencies in supporting a 10-year, locally led campaign called “America the Beautiful” to help our nation achieve this goal. To meet this momentous opportunity, the Service built a diverse team of dedicated staff across the agency to map the path forward on immediate tasks, identify additional actions, and track our progress. Individual teams work with the Directorate and other Service leadership teams, relevant Service groups such as the national climate team, and with outside entities such as the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and non-federal partners. This DFP project will support the team focused on results and measuring the progress of the America the Beautiful initiative within the agency. This “Results” team will not only map a path forward on key deliverables specified in the Administration’s preliminary report, but also contribute more broadly on how progress will be meaningfully tracked. The Results team works with additional teams specializing in early focal areas, including the creation of more outdoor opportunities in nature-deprived communities, support for tribally led conservation, and more, in their efforts to meet the goals and spirit of the America the Beautiful campaign. This is an unparalleled opportunity for professional development, networking, national influence, and working alongside leadership. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will survey and catalog 100 USFWS projects that are contributing to the campaign’s goals and communicating the science of conservation behind the projects. Join the team to help the Service fulfill the promise of our nation’s first-ever national conservation goal! DFP Fellow tasks and duties during the project will include supporting the team focused on results and measuring the progress of the America the Beautiful initiative within the agency, including efforts to review the condition of fish and wildlife habitats and populations.  The DFP will track and monitor progress on other emphasis areas, such as creation of more outdoor opportunities in nature-deprived communities and tribally-led conservation initiatives. By the end of the Fellowship, the Fellow will have 1) developed and delivered at least one outreach tool to communicate the science of conservation underlying a subset of the 100 America the Beautiful projects surveyed by the Fellow and 2) finalized a spreadsheet and text summary of the campaigns results and key messages.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in the Biological Sciences, Education/Outreach, Social Sciences/Humanities, GIS, Communications/Marketing, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: (1) Proficiency in Excel, including data entry and functions, organization & presentation; (2) Interest and/or experience in communication and science communication products.

Desired Characteristics: interpersonal communication, cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, leadership roles, teamwork, technical writing, and data management.