Invasive and Endangered Species Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Alaska

 Invasive Mussel Detectors of Alaska (Anchorage)

Project Type:  This is a field project, not telework eligible.  

Location: Regional Office, Alaska Region (Legacy Region 7/Interior Region 11); Anchorage, AK.

Housing: Supported (Non-FWS housing, ~$2,500 total)

Project Background: Who wants to spend the summer outside on the lakes and streams of Southcentral Alaska helping to protect these places?  If you are, then read on.  The Alaska Region of the US Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking a motivated and resourceful individual to implement our newly developed invasive species early detection framework for Southcentral Alaska; the primary focus area being the Anchorage Municipality and invasive mussels.  Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to Alaska’s natural environment and our way of life.  Detecting infestations early on is key to having a chance of eradicating the species before it significantly impacts its new environment and responding while it is still relatively low in cost.  Bolstering our collaborative early detection efforts in Alaska is a priority for the Alaska Region, the Department of Interior, and the Arctic Council.  

Project Duties: The Fellow will be based out of the Alaska Regional Office in Anchorage and work closely with our Conservation Genetics Lab as part of our invasive species team and will have ample opportunities to connect with staff from the National Wildlife Refuge Program, Fisheries and Aquatic Conservation Program. The individual will also work closely with our many partners, gaining an in-depth view into the diversity of the agencies and Alaska’s people and its natural treasures.   The Fellow’s primary duties will include: 1) gaining awareness of invasive species issues in Alaska; 2) finalizing a prioritized list of waterbodies to conduct surveys for invasive and native mussels; 3) conducting field surveys and laboratory work to look for invasive mussels and help the Region verify environmental DNA (eDNA) markers for invasive mussels; 4) identify and estimate abundance of invasive mussels captured in field collections; 5) write a summary report of initial findings with suggestions on how to improve the project for full implementation across a larger landscape; 6) develop and provide a presentation on the work. Come learn about Alaska’s rich natural resources and the cultures that depend on them while making a difference in preserving them for everyone to enjoy.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year or more of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: A valid driver’s license; Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs.

Desired Characteristics: Experience keying out invertebrates, mussels, plants; Basic understanding of genetic analyses; Interpersonal communication; Cross-cultural communication; Partnership building; Project management experience; Teamwork; Technical writing.

California

Developing population viability analyses for endangered plants (Sacramento)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, San Francisco Bay-Delta Fish and Wildlife Office, Sacramento, California

Housing: Supported, housing stipend amount dependent on documentation of actual cost of rent at remote work location ($1,000/month max)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Project Background:  The Endangered Species Act (ESA) sets high standards for the recovery of threatened and endangered species, and indicates that recovery plans should include “objective, measurable criteria” for determining if a given species should be removed from the endangered species list (ESA, Section 4(f)(1)(B)(ii)).  Service biologists often use population viability analyses (PVAs) for developing these criteria. PVAs often employ numerical approaches and simulations to determine how viable a given population would be under various plausible situations, and these analyses can in turn be used to determine appropriate recovery criteria for a given species. This project is mission critical because it will help support the Service’s goal of developing objective criteria for recovery of plant species listed under the ESA. https://www.fws.gov/endangered/esa-library/pdf/ESAall.pdf

Project Duties: The Fellow will help develop population viability analyses (PVAs) or endangered plants associated with a riverine dune ecosystem in California. The Fellow will use standard mathematical approaches and simulations to explore whether the recovery criteria currently used for several endangered plant species in California are appropriate, given the results of the PVA analyses; this approach could then also be used for other endangered plant species in other areas. We anticipate that this project will contribute to at least one peer-reviewed journal article in a scientific journal. Information from this project will also contribute to presentations at scientific and technical meetings.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Information Technology, Computer Science, Statistics, and/or Mathematical Biology, or other closely related field.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; Partnership building; Public speaking; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.); Teamwork; Technical Writing; Interest in numerical modeling in the life sciences or a related field.

Conducting status assessments for threatened, endangered, or at-risk species (Carlsbad)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office, Carlsbad CA

Housing: Supported by duty station, Non-FWS housing supported with $1,000 monthly stipend

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The project will use conservation biology principles to synthesize information, identify data gaps, and develop conservation actions to support species recovery. Status reviews of listed species are required by the Endangered Species Act. Status assessments update a species’ biology and threats and recommend future research and conservation actions. The project can be conducted completely remotely or in person depending on the COVID situation and the Fellow preferences. The Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office is in coastal northern San Diego County. The office includes primarily Ecological Services and the following divisions: Coastal Programs, Partners in Fish and Wildlife, Listing and Recovery, Permits and Consultations (Section 7 and 10).

Project Duties: Working with the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office (Carlsbad, CA), the Fellow will complete assessments for two species in southern California: 1) a status assessment or conservation strategy for a listed species, and 2) a rapid assessment to assess the status and conservation needs of an at-risk species, including facilitating an expert solicitation workshop. The Fellow will present the results of both assessments to the Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office. The Fellow will coordinate with researchers and State and Federal agencies to gather new information and identify important activities for conservation and recovery. With support from project supervisors, Fellow will work independently to review and synthesize new information. We emphasize developmental opportunities for Fellows to learn about the Endangered Species Act and the work of an Ecological Services Field office. For example, we encourage Fellows to network with Fish and Wildlife Service staff, participate in coordination meetings between staff biologists and partners, and attend trainings and webinars, as the project schedule permits. The project does not involve any required fieldwork, such as conducting surveys or monitoring. However, there may be opportunities for site visits to meet with land managers and species experts. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: 

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences i.e., Natural Resources Management, Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, Genetics, Microbiology, Chemistry, Land Management, Plant Science, Botany, Soil Science, Forestry, Invasive Species management, Plant Development, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: None

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Partnership building, Public speaking, Leadership roles, Teamwork, and Technical writing.

Strategic Conservation Planning for Endangered Species Recovery (Sacramento)

Location: Legacy Region 8, Pacific Southwest, Ecological Services Program, Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office, Sacramento, California

Housing: Supported by duty station, Non-FWS housing supported with $1,000 monthly stipend

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: The Sacramento Fish and Wildlife Office covers ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Great Central Valley, and the California coast and estuaries. It is a large office, made up of 75 employees focused on conserving over 100 listed and at-risk species and their habitats. The office prides itself on creating an inclusive and welcoming environment for everyone and is well-known for its conservation success through landscape-level HCPs, section 7 consultations, conservation banking, and working with others in creative ways to conserve and recover our trust species. Sacramento is a diverse community in the heart of Northern California providing vibrant city life with a variety nearby outdoor opportunity. San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite National Park, Napa Valley, and the Pacific Coast are all close by. Within a two-hour drive, you can be at the ocean or your favorite camping spot, or entertainment location. Summer months are sunny and dry, with daytime highs in the 90s and cool evenings in the 60s.

Project Duties: The Fellow will have the opportunity to develop a detailed step-by-step plan for conservation activities that will contribute to recovery of one or multiple species. The Fellow will be responsible for gathering information and working with both internal and external partners to assess the status of a threatened or endangered species and identify appropriate conservation activities. The Fellow will be expected to synthesize information into a written plan of action and present the plan to office leadership and staff. The project provides flexibility for the Fellow to utilize their unique skill set and interests while learning about multiple facets of the Endangered Species Act and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During the project, the Fellow will have the opportunity to conduct site visits with species experts and interact with Regional Office biologists. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in the Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information sciences; communications/marketing or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/ Requirements: none

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, teamwork, and technical writing.

Colorado

Biological Effects Analyst, Threatened and Endangered Species (Grand Junction)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Western Colorado Field Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

Housing: Supported ($4,000 housing stipend for summer)

Project Background: This position is within the Ecological Services Program and is stationed at the Western Colorado Field Office located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Fellow will develop conservation measures that will be incorporated into the Effects Pathway Manager (EPM) of the Service’s Environmental Conservation Online System (ECOS) to deliver robust conservation measures online to agencies and the public. Information collected and entered into EPM will help our Field Offices better evaluate potential impacts from proposed projects and allow Service biologists to focus on issues that have the largest potential conservation impact.

Project Duties: The Fellow will review available biological data and work with field biologists and species experts to develop conservation measures to protect Threatened and Endangered species. By compiling the extensive institutional knowledge of the Western Colorado Field Office’s experienced biologists, as well as documenting relevant citations and updating conservation measures to incorporate new science, the Fellow will create one-stop guidance for all Field Office biologists that is specific to and inclusive of all western Colorado listed species, thereby improving efficiency, and making defensible and consistent conservation recommendations for all our listed species. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: General knowledge of wildlife ecology, how to conduct a literature search, development/use of spreadsheets, and the ability to synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources.

Desired Characteristics: Self-motivated, yet team oriented. Students should be comfortable working with a variety of people as well as independently.

Updating the Legacy Region 6 Mega Biological Opinion: 2 Positions Available (Denver)

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Location: Legacy Region 6, Ecological Services, Regional Office, Denver, CO

Housing: Supported ($4,600 housing stipend for the summer)

Project Background: Section 9 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) prohibits taking federally listed species unless authorized by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the ESA allows for the issuance of recovery permits for otherwise prohibited acts if the activity is for scientific purposes. Permits may be issued for activities including but not limited to scientific research, monitoring populations, and performing educational programs that further the recovery of a federally listed species. The 2022 DFP project introduces the Fellow to crucial sections of the ESA to improve the understanding of how the recovery permitting program impacts listed species and their conservation range wide. The project is an ongoing effort and an extension of previous DFP efforts to revise and restructure the Mega Biological Opinion for Region’s recovery permitting program over the past two years. The Fellow will be guided by the DFP project manager, through this 11-week project to gain a strong foundation in how the FWS works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) review the history of the FWS’s Ecological Services Program and the statutes, the Endangered Species Act, the Section 7 Handbook, the Section 10 Handbook, and other materials provided to understand the basis of the Mega Biological Opinion (herein referred to as the Mega BO), 2) update species status, environmental baselines, and conservation measures sections of the Mega BO for the four Colorado River fish, 3) use specialized tools (i.e., a Topeka shiner) as a template for these sections and as illustrations of this new structure, 4) work with the Species’ Leads for these species to populate the new template structure for the status of the species/critical habitat and environmental baseline sections using the standardized template and guidance, and 5) develop a Teams-based presentation to the Regional and Field Offices showcasing project achievements. Join us and learn how the FWS administers the ESA, focusing on assessing the effects of our recovery permitting program through the section 7 consultation process by updating species status, environmental baseline, and conservation measures for the four Colorado River fish, work with local species experts and regional coordinators, and build skills in leadership, including critical and strategic thinking, innovation, creativity, and independent work habits.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License and ability to drive federal vehicles.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal Communication, Project Management Experience, Leadership Roles, Teamwork, and Technical Writing.

Kentucky

IPaC Development of Conservation Measures and Effects Pathways (Frankfort)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office, Frankfort, KY

Housing: Supported, Funding available for summer living accommodations

Project Background:   The US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Information, Planning, and Conservation decision support system (IPaC) can provide project design recommendations, collect environmental baseline information, and provide for the completion of much of the threatened and endangered Section 7 consultation process via the Internet. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Southeast Region Ecological Services Program. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will: 1) conduct literature reviews, 2) compile conservation measures (actions that benefit or promote the recovery of listed species) for three Endangered Species Act listed species, 3) conduct an organizational review of the information, 4) enter the conservation measures into the Effects Pathway Manager, and 5) modify/update a manual for future use by other USFWS staff. The Fellow will work directly with the Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office as well as Regional Office and the Division of Environmental Review. As part of the final presentation, the Fellow will recommend improvements to the IPaC system.

Minimum Education Requirements and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: This is a remote DFP project that requires a general knowledge of wildlife ecology, the ability to conduct a literature search, and familiarity with the development/use of spreadsheets.

Desired Characteristics: A strong candidate for this position will have strong skills in interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management, leadership, teamwork, and technical writing.

Louisiana

Protocol Development for Invasive Tree Management (Ferriday)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; St. Catherine Creek National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Natchez, MS and Bayou Cocodrie National Wildlife Refuge, Ferriday, LA

Housing: Supported (Rent-free housing at Duty Station)

Project Background: This project will assist refuge management planning by identifying, mapping, and producing protocols for treatment and monitoring of invasive trees on two national wildlife refuges. St. Catherine Creek NWR in Natchez, Mississippi, is well known for the thousands of wading birds, waterfowl, and forest birds, which utilize the dense flooded areas, swamps, bottomland forests, and uplands. Bayou Cocodrie NWR is just across the Mississippi River in Ferriday, Louisiana, and is a mixed-hardwood forest supporting black bear, large and small game species, forest breeding birds, and more. This project is mission critical as it is designed to aid Refuge management to conserve, protect, enhance, and appropriately restore the biological integrity of the native ecosystem and the species which are supported by the various habitat types on the refuges.

Project Duties: The Fellow will create and compile protocols for surveying, mapping, treatment, and monitoring plans for treatment of several invasive, non-native tree species on two national wildlife refuges. This project will provide an opportunity to improve skills in plant species identification, basic forestry, biological assessments, GIS, writing, research, outdoor recreation planning, and natural resources management. There may be opportunities for networking, and training such as ORUV (UTV/ATV), chainsaw, and more.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, Natural Resources Management, Forestry, Geographic Information Science, or a closely related field.

Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences; education and outreach; social sciences; geographic information; or other closely related field

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License; Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment.

Desired Characteristics: Leadership capacity, Teamwork, and experience with: Technical Writing, GIS, Botany/Forestry/Species ID, and Invasive Weed control.

Massachusetts

Recovery Permits Biological Opinion Development (Hadley)

Project Type: This is a telework only project. The Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location: Legacy Region 5, North Atlantic Appalachian Regional Office, Hadley, MA

Housing: Supported, up to $1500/month stipend available

Project Background: The position is in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Region 5 (Northeast) Regional Office in Hadley, MA and supervised by the Manager of the Division of Endangered Species.  The objective of the project is to complete a programmatic Biological Opinion to support issuance of Endangered Species Act Recovery Permits.  Recovery Permits authorize take of listed species resulting from implementation of priority Recovery actions identified in species Recovery Plans.  These actions include surveys and monitoring, research, propagation, and reintroductions.  Accomplishing the project will satisfy the Division’s statutory obligation under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act to consult on issuance of Recovery Permits to ensure that permit issuance does not jeopardize listed endangered and threatened species or adversely modify their critical habitats.  By facilitating the issuance of Recovery Permits, the project will enable Service employees, states, NGOs, and other partners to implement recovery actions thus contributing to imperiled species conservation and supporting the priorities and the mission of the Service.

Project Duties: Under the guidance of the Regional Recovery Permits Coordinator and Regional Section Coordinator, the Fellow will: 1) lead a team comprising Field Office Species Leads to develop the project Background, 2) develop a framework for the Biological Opinion, 3) analyze the effects of the issuance of Recovery Permits on target and nontarget endangered and threatened species, 4) quantify take of listed species resulting from implementation of the recovery activities, and 4)develop and review minimization measures and monitoring and reporting requirements. The Fellow will write a draft Biological Opinion, solicit review, and comment, and prepare a final document for signature.

In addition to working with the Regional program coordinators and Field Office staff, the  Fellow will provide regular updates for the Division Manager and written or verbal briefings for the Deputy Assistant Regional Director and other managers as necessary. While the Regional program coordinators will provide direction and policy assistance, the Fellow will be expected to conduct most work independently, exercise critical thinking, and vet ideas with appropriate staff and managers. The Fellow provide regular briefings for the Deputy ARD and present the final draft Biological Opinion to the Deputy ARD through a comprehensive presentation describing the project, obstacles encountered and how they were resolved, lessons learned, and recommendations for follow-up actions. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year or more of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing a degree in biological sciences, environmental law and policy, or closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: None specified.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communications, project management experience, public speaking, teamwork, technical writing.

Minnesota

Wetland bathymetry and a synthesis of cattail management (Middle River)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 3 (Midwest); Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Middle River, Minnesota

Housing: Supported, bunkhouse, on-site

Project Background: This Fellowship position is located at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, located in northwest Minnesota within an ecologically unique transition zone between deciduous and boreal forests to the east and tallgrass prairie to the west. Agassiz NWR consists of 61,500 acres with the majority (60%) considered wetland habitat; much of this is in the form of actively managed wetland impoundments. The Refuge provides critical breeding and migratory habitat for numerous species of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other avian populations, and is home to a variety of resident wildlife including moose, bears, wolves, deer, grouse, and turkey. Cattail species are an ongoing threat to wetland habitat on the Refuge due to the aggressive growth of hybrid cattail which eliminates important habitat for nesting and migratory birds. The Refuge has been managing invasive cattail for >10 years with varying levels of success in different pools. This project would aim to inform management on how cattail is affecting wetland habitat quality, pool storage capacity, and in turn, how Agassiz management is affecting cattail. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will 1) collect bathymetry data on a wetland impoundment, and 2) incorporate that data into an evaluation of past cattail management records on the Refuge.

This work will include field data collection, input, and analysis (via ArcGIS); reviewing Refuge records on past management; and exploring correlations or trends between management techniques, water levels, and cattail recovery or regeneration patterns. The Fellow will incorporate their findings on the bathymetry work to examine water depth relationships with cattail extent. The Fellow will produce a final report and presentation on their investigation of cattail management at Agassiz NWR. In addition, the Fellow will get to attend the week-long Student Intern Workshop at the Regional Office to gain exposure to all the opportunities within the Fish and Wildlife Service.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences, Geographic Information Sciences or other closely related field (e.g., Natural Resources Management, Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, Genetics, Microbiology, Chemistry, Land Management, Plant Science, Botany, Soil Science, Forestry, Invasive Species management) are qualified. Graduate students are also encouraged to apply. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: A valid driver’s license and an ability to drive federal vehicles, ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, ability to lift/carry 50 lbs., ability, and willingness to live in a remote area for weeks at a time, and experience with ArcGIS.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, project management experience, public speaking skills or interest, conflict management and resolution skills, management and facilitation skills, technical writing skills, and interest in data analysis.

Montana

Ultrasound Guided Identification of Atresia in Pallid Sturgeon (Bozeman)

Project Type: This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Bozeman Fish Technology and Health Center, Bozeman, Montana

Housing: Supported ($6,000 housing stipend for the summer)

Project Background: The DFP Fellow will be working at the Bozeman Fish Technology and Health Center in Bozeman, MT. A high rate of follicular atresia has been identified in hatchery-origin pallid sturgeon during their first gametogenic cycle as well as wild pallid sturgeon. Population modelling for the species requires accurate information about age at first spawning and spawning periodicity to assess spawning stock biomass. The specific objective will be to develop a Guide to Identification of Follicular Atresia Using Ultrasonography in Pallid Sturgeon. This guide will be a field guide provided to all state and federal agencies and universities working with pallid sturgeon in the Missouri, Yellowstone, and Mississippi Rivers. The guide will be invaluable for identification of atresia using ultrasonography and allow for an assessment of atresia across the species range in a non-invasive manner. A final presentation will be given to the Basin-wide Pallid Sturgeon Propagation Committee.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work to develop a Guide to Identification of Follicular Atresia Using Ultrasonography in Pallid Sturgeon. The Fellow will participate in the final presentation given to the Basin-wide Pallid Sturgeon Propagation Committee.

The Fellow will receive training and experience in the care of fishes, reproductive physiology of fishes, and assessment of tools used to assign sex and stage of maturity in our threatened and endangered aquatic species, though the Fellow will be working directly with the endangered pallid sturgeon. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Science or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Project will take place in a laboratory as well as a wet laboratory. Valid driver’s license and the ability to lift and carry 50 lbs.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, teamwork, technical writing, and eagerness to learn.

New Mexico

Bolson Tortoise Habitat Suitability (Albuquerque)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Southwest Region, New Mexico Ecological Service Field Office – Albuquerque, NM

Housing: Supported, Offsite 100 miles away, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge

Project Background: The DFP Fellow would advance achievement of recovery actions for the Bolson tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus) an endangered federally listed species. The historic range or this species includes the southwestern United States but identifying land expanses without management issues for the purposes of repatriation is important to this species survival.  Visits to the Armendariz and Ladder Ranches will be important since there is a captive breeding program and monitoring of transmitter tagged tortoises on the ranches. Habitat and site conditions will be characterized to use as a proxy for re-introduction efforts on Bosque del Apache and Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuges. 

Logistics planning would require coordination with Turner Endangered Species Fund staff and Refuge Managers/biologists. Successful implementation of the project plan would require a high degree of autonomy, personal responsibility, and project management skills. If necessary, a telework-based alternative can be adopted; however, site visits will be necessary to understand the dynamics of the habitat.

Project Duties: The DFP Fellow will: 1) plan field tours with Turner Endangered Species Fund personnel and National Wildlife Refuges to discover suitable translocation areas, 2) collect and manage geospatial data, and 3) photo document with pictures needed for the final report and presentation The Fellow will produce a report with methodology, habitat conditions, pictures, geospatial data, and recommended actions for the USFWS. The Fellow will produce an oral presentation that will cover project methods, achievements and recommendations for future would be given to leadership at the end of the Fellowship.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least their first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD), and is pursuing (biology, ecology, wildlife management, and geographic and information sciences) or a closely related field.

Assessment of pollinator presence at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex (Watrous)

Project Type: Field. This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Southwest Region, Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge – Watrous, NM 

Housing: Supported, Bunkhouse at Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge 

Project Background: New Mexico is one of the most diverse states in terms of pollinators with over 1,000 species of native bees and over 350 species of butterflies. However, pollinator data is significantly lacking in Northern New Mexico, especially at the Northern New Mexico National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Grassland health and management is a biological priority for all three refuges in the complex. Pollinator populations are in decline due to habitat loss, fragmentation, and invasive species. Assessments of pollinator status and health remain a national priority, as documented cases of species loss continue to accrue globally. It is critical to expand Federal efforts and take new steps to reverse pollinator losses and help restore populations to healthy levels.

Science Applications USFWS Legacy Region 2 has identified the critical need to monitor pollinator populations across the Southwest refuges. This project will assist with the national pollinator team to develop FWS pollinator databases, standard protocols, and citizen science programs while creating baseline inventories at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex. 

This project takes place at the Northern New Mexico NWR Complex, which includes the Las Vegas, Maxwell, and Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuges in Northeastern New Mexico. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will complete surveys, curate insect samples and assist with developing standard protocols in collaboration with USFWS staff, New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU) researchers and private partners. Fellows will also shadow refuge managers, biologists, maintenance workers, New Mexico Invasive Species Strike Team, and visitor service managers at the complex. NMHU and the complex collaborate on research projects and Fellows will be able to assist professors and students.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, education and outreach, geographic information sciences, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs., and Ability and willingness to live in a remote camp for weeks at a time.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; Cross-Cultural communication skills; Partnership building; Management/Facilitation; Public speaking; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.) Teamwork; and Technical Writing.

Oregon

Southern Oregon and Northern California Bumble Bee Habitat Surveys: 2 Positions Available (Ashland)

Location: R8: Yreka Fish & Wildlife Office, Yreka, CA, and R1: Oregon Fish & Wildlife Office, Portland, OR

Housing: Supported, up to $280/week provided for local housing in Ashland, OR

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Project Background: Widespread declines in bumble bees and other pollinators have been documented in recent decades. Southern Oregon and northern California offer extensive high-quality habitat, particularly at higher elevations, for native pollinators such as Franklin’s bumble bee, yet more surveys and thorough habitat assessments are needed. Surveys will be coordinated with other agencies and individuals including the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Arcata FWO, other researchers and surveyors, and the U.S. Geological Survey. This project is an excellent opportunity to learn about the Service’s Ecological Services programs and gather data that will be used for Species Status Assessments (SSA), recovery planning, and conservation on a landscape scale. Two Fellows will coordinate with both office locations listed above and complete all fieldwork together. The team will be based in Ashland, Oregon, a center of arts and culture nestled in a valley between rugged mountains.

Project Duties: The Fellows will systematically survey and sample known historic bumble bee locations during the FY22 field season, and a selection of highly suitable habitat sites will be developed from a digitized GIS habitat layer. The Fellows will: 1) catch and identify bumble bees, 2) gather habitat information, including the availability of floral resources throughout the growing season, and 3) collect genetic samples. Fellows will network with various partners at the yearly bumble bee Survey on Mt Ashland in July and may also participate in other fieldwork and learning opportunities with FWS employees and local partners. One Fellow will be supervised by the Oregon FWO and one Fellow will be supervised by the Yreka FWO. After data collection is complete, the Fellows will develop a written report and deliver an oral presentation to the Service and our partners sharing their results. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: 

Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences (i.e., Natural Resources Mgmt., Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Enviro. Science, Land Mgmt., Plant Science, Soil Sci., Forestry, Invasive Species Mgmt., Plant Development), Geographic & Information Sciences, Geology, Spatial Analysis, Remote Sensing), or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs; Familiarity with ESRI software and apps (e.g., ArcGIS Pro and Collector) and an ability to operate a GPS unit. Fellows will be required to hike, camp, work remotely in pairs, and drive on four-wheel drive roads.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills; Partnership building; Project Mgmt. experience; Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.); Teamwork; Insect identification, especially bumble bees; Plant identification and pollinator ecology; Wilderness or back-country first aid/survival skills.

Puerto Rico

Red-tailed Boa Assessment within Endangered Species Release Areas (Maricao)

Project Type: Field – This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office (CESFO), Boquerón / Maricao Duty Station, Boquerón / Maricao, Puerto Rico

Housing: Supported ($1,500 stipend)

Project Background: The Department of the Interior has developed a strategic plan goal of advancing invasive species management by implementing early detection surveys to study movements and feeding patterns. The main goal of the project is to assist with the implementation of this plan and control the Red-tailed boas within the Puerto Rican parrot (PRPA) and the Sharp-shinned hawk (SSHA) release areas in Maricao and Adjuntas, Puerto Rico. Assessing the behavior of this species is critical to ensure a successful reintroduction of SSHA and the establishment of the third PRPA wild population. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work on these major goals of the project 1) Cond:uct rapid-assessments to determine presence/absence and occupancy of Red-tailed boas in the PRPA release site at Maricao, P.R. and SSHA release site in Adjuntas, P.R.; 2) Control the Red-tailed boa population by the capture and removal of the encountered individuals in the PRPA release site at Maricao, P.R. and SSHA release site in Adjuntas, P.R.; 3) Conduct an assessment of Red-tailed boa feeding patterns in the PRPA release site at Maricao, P.R. and SSHA release site in Adjuntas, P.R. by conducting stomach content analyses in collaboration with the University of Puerto Rico Ecology and Wildlife Conservation Lab.; 4) Conduct an assessment of Red-tailed boa movement patterns in and around the PRPA release site at Maricao, P.R. and SSHA release site in Adjuntas, P.R. by tracking 3-5 individuals using radio-transmitters.; and 5) Administer a species identification chart in communities located within a 1 km radius from both release sites to determine and validate Red-tailed boa sightings. 

The Fellow will have the opportunity to collaborate with CESFO’s staff and supervisors in both planning and field work, working with university partners leading invasive species control and management in Puerto Rico, learning about recovery and introduction programs of federally listed species, and preparing reports and presentations.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, Natural Resources Management, Biology, Wildlife Conservation, Fisheries, Zoology, Environmental Science, Ecology, Genetics, Microbiology, Chemistry, Land Management, Plant Science, Botany, Soil Science, Forestry, Invasive Species Management, Plant Development, or other related fields.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Required to have a valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle); Fluency in Spanish; Ability to conduct field work on rough terrains; ability to lift and carry 50lb.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication; cross-cultural communication skills, partnership building; project management experience; teamwork; management and facilitation, technical writing.

Tennessee

Wetland Geodatabase for Aquatic Invasive Species (Stanton)

Project Type: Field – this field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership 

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge, Stanton, TN

Housing: Supported (housing provided rent-free at duty station)

Project Background: Hatchie NWR has ~10,000 acres of forested wetlands with mature hardwood forests, dozens of lakes, and impoundments with active management for waterfowl and other birds. Invasive species are a common problem for managers on the refuge and represent a significant risk for threatened and endangered species, species of conservation concern, and focal species for management. Tracking invasive species is challenging because population can be dynamic and control efforts continually eradicate or reduce local populations. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will work on the following projects: 1) modify and update a wetland geodatabase created in 2021 with spatial distribution and key descriptive metrics (e.g., acres, density, persistence) for common aquatic invasive species (e.g., Alternanthera philoxeroides, Hydrilla verticillata) to assist with control, resource allocation, risk assessment, and monitoring to support adaptive resource management on National Wildlife Refuges, 2) will compile existing spatial datasets and modify the existing spatial wetland database to add information on aquatic invasive species occurrence, spatial distribution, density, persistence (response to previous control efforts) and other metrics, 3) use existing energetic constants to estimate energetic carrying capacity for waterfowl and other waterbirds in areas where the invasive species occur, and 4) complete a final report, finalize the updated geodatabase, and potentially publish their results after the findings are presented to Hatchie NWR staff and stakeholders.

This work will be done in collaboration with the regional invasive species coordinator, regional waterfowl ecologist, regional Inventory & Monitoring Branch staff, and NWR managers and biologists and will include the regional Invasive Species Framework and Management Plan. 

The Fellow will have considerable decision space in designing attributes and modifying the spatial database. This project will require leadership, decision making skills, and high levels of communication with regional and local NWR staff.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Graduate student who has completed at least the first year of graduate school (Masters or PhD) and is pursuing a degree in a natural resource-related field with coursework or certifications in geographic information systems and/or spatial data analysis, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements:  If working on site, Fellow must have a driver’s license and be able to travel from lodging location to office location daily. If working remotely – Fellow will need access to an environment conducive to telework (i.e., reliable, high-speed internet, etc.)

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal skills, project management experience, teamwork experience, leadership experience, partnership building experience, and technical writing skills.

Texas

Survey of Guadalupe fatmucket populations in Guadalupe River tributaries (Austin)

Project Type: Field. This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 2, Southwest Region, Austin Texas Ecological Services Field Office – Austin, Texas 

Housing: $750/month housing stipend

Project Background: The Austin Texas Ecological Services Field Office is seeking a Fellow to complete freshwater mussel surveys for a recently proposed endangered species in the upper Guadalupe River basin. The proposed project supports the Services’ “Threatened and Endangered Species: Achieving Recovery and Preventing Extinction” priority by identifying occupied habitats for a species recently proposed for federal listing as an Endangered Species.  

Data collected by the project will be used by the Ecological Services and Fisheries and Aquatic Conservation branches of the Service by 1) identifying occupied and unoccupied habitats for the Guadalupe fatmucket (Lampsilis bergmanni) in under-surveyed tributaries located in the upper Guadalupe River basin; 2) identifying potential sources of brood stock for propagation activities and federal hatcheries; and 3) identifying potential future restoration sites for the species. 

Project Duties:  The Fellow will complete freshwater mussel surveys for a recently proposed endangered species in the upper Guadalupe River basin. The proposed project supports the Services’ “Threatened and Endangered Species: Achieving Recovery and Preventing Extinction” priority by identifying occupied habitats for a species recently proposed for federal listing as an Endangered Species.  At the conclusion of the project, the Fellow will prepare and submit a final survey report detailing findings of the surveys that will include background, methodology Backgrounds, tables summarizing survey results, and associated figures and mapping. The Fellow will also present the findings of the project to Austin ESFO staff and their internal and external conservation partners.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Environmental Studies, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: The selected Fellow will need a current, valid driver’s license and obtain approval to drive federal vehicles, be able to life/carry up to 50 lbs., and be able to conduct field work that may require hiking, and complete USFWS Region 2 snorkeling and water safety training.

Desired Characteristics: Desired characteristics for the selected Fellow may include project management experience, interpersonal communication skills, demonstrated leadership and teamwork experiences, and technical writing experience.

Salinity Trends on the Upper Texas Coast (Anahuac)

Project Type: Field. This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 2, Southwest Region, Texas Chenier Plains National Wildlife Refuge – Anahuac, TX

Housing: Supported at duty station, rent free

Project Background: The meandering bayous of the Texas Chenier Plains National Wildlife Refuge Complex cut through ancient flood plains, creating vast expanses of coastal marsh and prairie bordering Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico in southeast Texas. The marshes and prairies are host or home to an abundance of wildlife, from migratory birds, to alligators, to bobcats, and more. Monitoring and evaluating salinities on the Texas Gulf Coast is critical for current and future habitat conservation and management. Water salinity is a driving force for both plant and animal communities within the region. Tropical cyclones, sea-level rise, accretion and subsidence, marsh management, and urbanization are few primary factors affecting water salinities on the Texas Chenier Plains National Wildlife Refuges Complex. Evaluating trends in a long-term salinity data sets will allow biologists and managers to improve best management practices for critical vegetative communities and Threatened and Endangered wildlife and fish species, while predicting and planning for changes in coastal environments. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will collect and analyze long-term salinity data while expanding their knowledge of field methods and biology across the wildlife refuge complex. The Fellow will: 1) collect weekly salinities data and establish databases on both Anahuac and McFaddin NWRs by collecting weekly samples via airboats and YSIs. 2) work directly or remotely with Anahuac and McFaddin biologists to gather and organize long-term salinity data bases in Excel for each refuge, 3) analyze long-term salinity trends in relation to sea-level rise, tropical cyclone events, major rainfall events, management in collaboration with FWS statisticians, and 4) draw conclusions, forecast predictions, compose a report, and present results to biologists, maintenance staff, and refuge. Throughout the duration of the DFP, work with refuge managers, biologists, and maintenance staff to broaden field experience, networking skills, and biological knowledge on topics outside of the objectives of the primary DFP project. The Fellow will also frequently assist with management tasks such as mottled duck banding, moist-soil management, water-level management, invasive species control, organic rice farming, and cattle grazing programs. The Fellow will have the opportunity to network with refuge managers, biologists, and maintenance staff, in addition to refining data analysis, writing, and presentation skills.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in (biological sciences; geographic information sciences; statistics) or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid driver’s license (needed to drive a Government vehicle); Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment; ability to lift/carry 50 lbs.; Ability to use Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. 

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management experience, leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), teamwork, conflict management/facilitation, technical writing, and statistical analysis.

Wisconsin

Validating eDNA markers for Aquatic Invasive Species (Onalaska)

Project Type: Field. This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 3, Midwest, Midwest Fishery Center-Whitney Genetics Lab, Onalaska, WI

Housing: Supported Offsite, $750/month stipend provided

Project Background: The Whitney Genetics Laboratory (WGL) is a state-of-the-art conservation genetics lab located in Onalaska, Wisconsin. Onalaska is in the driftless region of Wisconsin which is characterized by high bluffs along the Mississippi River and deep river valleys and is home to countless outdoor recreation opportunities as well as three colleges and universities. The lab uses advanced technology including qPCR, automated liquid handling robots, and next-generation sequencers to address conservation genetics issues including early monitoring for aquatic invasive species (AIS), species ID of unknown tissue samples, and monitoring of threatened and endangered native aquatic species. Environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an essential tool for the early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Before eDNA tools can be incorporated into AIS monitoring programs, rigorous laboratory testing and validation is required. The objective of this project is to determine a workflow and the resources necessary for validating new eDNA markers in our laboratory and to validate existing eDNA markers for the Northern Snakehead; an emerging AIS threat to the Great Lakes and upper Mississippi River watersheds. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will create the following deliverables for this project: 1) a validated eDNA assay for Northern Snakehead, 2) a written report outlining the marker validation workflow and the required resources, and 3) an oral presentation describing the project results to WGL staff and Regional AIS staff. The Fellow will have the opportunity to visit our Regional Office to meet with AIS and other Fisheries Program staff. The Fellow will also have opportunities to interact with and assist staff from the co-located LaCrosse Fish Health Center and LaCrosse Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License (needed to drive a Government vehicle)

Desired Characteristics: Inter-personal communication, partnership building, teamwork, and experience in a chemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, or genetics laboratory is desired.

Telework

Foreign Species Fellow – Candidate Notice of Review Project: 2 Positions Available

Project Type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Location: This is a project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing:  Not supported. 

Project Background: Please join the dynamic team in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Headquarters Office for an exciting Fellowship opportunity with the Ecological Services Program, Branch of Delisting and Foreign Species.  The two positions are in Falls Church, Virginia, just outside the Nation’s Capital, allowing for ample networking opportunities both within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and with external partners. The selected Fellow will assist the Service in meeting the statutory requirement of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to assess annually the status of foreign species listed as candidates for inclusion on the Lists of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants under the ESA.  This work is essential in determining whether a species should be elevated or removed from candidate status or have its listing priority number changed. 

Project Duties:  Specifically, the Fellow will be responsible for conducting literature searches for the best scientific and commercial information available to assess the status of 19 foreign species listed as candidates under the ESA. The Fellow will update the species status assessments based on their research, and work to conduct briefings and prepare documents (including briefing papers, and outreach materials) associated with the 19 foreign species for inclusion in the formal review and submission of the Candidate Notice of Review (CNOR) to the Federal Register.  This is a terrific Fellowship opportunity if you are interested in learning more about international conservation and federal and international laws governing wildlife as well as gaining experience in endangered species research and writing!

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Other: Knowledge in wildlife biology, environmental science and policy, ecology, or similar preferred; experience with basic computer applications.

ECOSphere support for Field Offices in the Southwest Region: 5 Positions Available

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location: Remote

Housing: $750/month housing stipend. The work will be entirely remote.

Project Background: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is the premier fish and wildlife agency with a mission of working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. This position would work within the Legacy Region 2, Southwest Region (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) supporting the Regional and Field Offices therein. The position is expected to operate from a remote location utilizing tele/video conferencing and electronic mail, with at least one week of travel to work directly with field/regional staff. 

The web applications are part of the larger FWS data management system known as the Environmental Conservation Online System (ECOS – http://ecos.fws.gov/ecp/). Information collected and entered into the applications will help our field offices better evaluate potential impacts from proposed projects and allow Service personnel to focus on issues that have the largest potential conservation impact.

Project Duties: : The Fellow will assist in enhancing the Southwest Region’s online endangered and threatened species applications for Service staff and our external partners, including the general public. The Fellow will 1) review available biological data, 2) develop a strategy to target species’ needs, 3) summarize relevant species’ needs and life stages, and 4) complete data entry specific applications in the Service’s ECOSphere web tool, and 5) work directly with species’ lead biologists. The Fellow will be trained to use the following applications: Effects Pathway Manager (EPM), Threatened and Endangered Species System (TESS), and Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC). The Fellow will utilize FWS internal applications to supply missing or updated information that would work externally to provide increased functionality to the public and enhance our ability to provide conservation for listed species.  The Fellow will review literature and work with species experts to complete interconnected pathways that clearly depict the ways in which potential changes to the environment (e.g., land use development) may result in impacts to target species. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, geographic information sciences or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: The work will be entirely remote.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, partnership building, project management experience, public speaking, teamwork, management/facilitation, technical writing.

Listed Species Determination Key Development (Columbus)

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station.

Location: Legacy Region 3, Ohio Field Office, Columbus, Ohio

Housing: Supported – $5,000.00 total 

Project Background: The US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Information, Planning, and Conservation decision support system (IPaC) can currently deliver Endangered Species Act species lists and detailed resource information. It will soon be able to provide project design recommendations, collect environmental baseline information, and provide for the completion of much of the Threatened and Endangered section 7 consultation process via the Internet. Development and utilization of the IPaC system is a top priority for the USFWS Region 3 Endangered Species Program. Throughout the process, the Fellow would work with a Field Office biologist as their direct supervisor and work closely with other biologists in the Field Office with expertise on the species that will be addressed by the Determination Keys.

Project Duties: The Fellow will develop one or more Determination Keys that will address the effects of federal projects on at least five listed species that occur in Ohio. The Fellow will: 1) conduct an organizational review of the information available from species- and project experts in the Ohio Field Office, 2) compile that information into a Determination Key choice and logic spreadsheet that will be coded as part of the IPaC system, and 3) present the finding in an oral presentation to the Ohio field office staff and other stakeholders.  As part of the final presentation, the Fellow will recommend a template approach to developing Determination Keys for other species. The Fellow will gain expertise on the function of USFWS field offices, how they interact with subject matter experts in other offices and other federal agencies, and how they cooperate with those agencies to conserve listed species. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, natural resource management, environmental studies, geographic information sciences, or other closely related field. 

Working Conditions/Requirements: General knowledge of wildlife ecology, Familiar with the development/use of spreadsheets

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Project Management experience, Teamwork, Knowledge of the Endangered Species Act and the regulations and policies relating to its administration.

Assessing Adaptive Capacity and Climate Vulnerability for At-Risk Species

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in-person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region; SECAS Western Field Office, Columbia, MO

Housing: Not Supported; this is a remote project.

Project Background:  Assessment of climate vulnerability is vitally important to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to make listing and classification decisions under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Fellow will help the Service develop a rigorous and consistent approach to assessing climate vulnerability with emphasis on evaluating adaptive capacity. This is a remote project that will be managed cooperatively by staff from the Science Applications program’s Columbia, MO Field Office and the Ecological Services program from the Regional Office in Atlanta, GA. The successful candidate will help the Service develop a rigorous and consistent approach to assessing climate vulnerability with emphasis on evaluating adaptive capacity. The selected Fellow will work closely with Service staff at multiple levels of the organization (field, Regional Office, and Headquarters) and scientists at the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center, as well as outside experts and partners.

Project Duties: The Fellow will conduct research and will create a prototype process or tool that FWS and US. Geological Survey (USGS) biologists can apply to any species under review. 

  • The Fellow will design a process or tool to highlight what aspects of climate change are most important to analyze when biologists conduct the full Species Status Assessment and can be implemented to inform upcoming decisions for species on the National Listing Work Plan, as well as other policy decisions under the ESA. 

The Fellow will also deliver two presentations to FWS and USGS staff and a final report suitable for publication in a scientific journal! The Fellow will work closely with Service staff at multiple levels of the organization (field, Regional Office, and Headquarters) and scientists at the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center, as well as outside experts and partners to conduct research. The successful candidate will have multiple networking opportunities with staff in other regions and partner organizations, as well as opportunities to develop facilitation and decision analysis skills! 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, Geographic Information Sciences, Environmental Policy, or other closely related field

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License and ability to drive federal vehicles; Experience developing and manipulating databases.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, Public speaking, Partnership building, Teamwork, Technical Writing, Project Management experience.

Review of Public comments on ESA 4(d) Proposed Rulemaking

Project type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership. 

Location:  This is a project based out of Region 9 (Headquarters), Falls Church, VA.

Housing:  Not supported.

Project Background: This opportunity will provide the DFP with a Headquarters experience.  The DFP’s work will fit into the mission of our program by contributing towards conservation of a foreign species by being part of a team that works on reviewing and responding to public comments and revising a final rule under Section 4 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA); primarily working with a staff biologist.  The DFP will gain experience in the federal rulemaking process and will gain an understanding of the regulatory realm of the federal government.  The DFP will learn about responding to public comments through the rulemaking process, will gain exposure to regulations.gov, and will learn about the U.S. FWS International Affairs Program (IA), and the ESA.  Professional development opportunities include being able to meet staff within FWS IA and headquarters, gaining a headquarters experience, and gaining experience with the rulemaking process.

Project Duties: During the Fellowship, the DFP Fellow will work on a team within IA/DMA by reviewing, drafting responses to and organizing comments on a proposal to revise a 4(d) rule for a charismatic high-profile species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). We anticipate receiving upwards of 100,000 comments on the proposed rule and the Fellow will have the opportunity to engage in a task that is foundational to U.S. government service in implementing laws and regulations by reviewing, organizing, analyzing, and responding to comments from the public on the revision to an ESA 4(d) rule.  The Fellow will be expected to attend staff meetings within IA; demonstrate a high degree of autonomy and personal responsibility while working on the project. At the end of the internship, the Fellow will present the culmination of their work to the key decision maker; the Chief, Branch of Permits.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological sciences, social science, outreach, or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: N/A.

Desired Characteristics: N/A.

Re-design and Implementation of Advanced Applications for Conservation of Listed Species

Project Type: This is a telework only project, Fellow will not report in person to a duty station

Location: Legacy Region 4, Southeast Region, Atlanta Regional Office

Housing: Not Supported

Project Background: Ecological Services in the Southeast Region in Atlanta, GA, is looking for an individual with a dual interest in conservation and information technology to design and implement advanced applications program. The Southeast Region offers a high-energy, welcoming environment that embraces innovation and values the contributions of all – particularly those with fresh perspectives on old problems.  Opportunities for personal and professional growth abound, and in this position, the Fellow will learn and exercise critical skills in negotiation, conflict resolution, and strategic thinking while having a ton of fun. This position is considered developmental and represents a novel – yet needed – expertise that we are looking to strengthen within our program.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work with a broad swath of staff at all levels of the program (and beyond) to develop critical information tools that support regional workforce planning efforts and the alignment of recovery actions for endangered and threatened species. The Fellow will assist in the development of a Communication Plan for the Landscape Recovery tool and present it to the team for feedback. Specific Duties/Tasks include: 1) Work with staff from Ecological Services and Science Applications (and other programs, as appropriate) to identify available data and work plans, tracking and reporting needs, and other requirements of the workload database; 2) expand and re-design of the Landscape Recovery Tool to complete existing modules and develop data for other locations, and 3) attend Ecological Services workforce planning meetings, project leader meetings, and others as appropriate.

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree with demonstrated expertise in the Biological Sciences, Geographic and Information Sciences, and Information Technology/Computer Science or a closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Some knowledge of or proficiency in Microsoft Power BI

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication skills, partnership building, project management, teamwork, Conflict Resolution/Facilitation, Creativity, and an Openness to Learn!