Montana Projects

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To apply for any position(s), please email the project title and your resume to ansep.web@gmail.com

Ultrasound Guided Identification of Atresia in Pallid Sturgeon (Bozeman)

Project Type: This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Bozeman Fish Technology and Health Center, Bozeman, Montana

Housing: Supported ($6,000 housing stipend for the summer)

Project Background: The DFP Fellow will be working at the Bozeman Fish Technology and Health Center in Bozeman, MT. A high rate of follicular atresia has been identified in hatchery-origin pallid sturgeon during their first gametogenic cycle as well as wild pallid sturgeon. Population modelling for the species requires accurate information about age at first spawning and spawning periodicity to assess spawning stock biomass. The specific objective will be to develop a Guide to Identification of Follicular Atresia Using Ultrasonography in Pallid Sturgeon. This guide will be a field guide provided to all state and federal agencies and universities working with pallid sturgeon in the Missouri, Yellowstone, and Mississippi Rivers. The guide will be invaluable for identification of atresia using ultrasonography and allow for an assessment of atresia across the species range in a non-invasive manner. A final presentation will be given to the Basin-wide Pallid Sturgeon Propagation Committee.

Project Duties: The Fellow will work to develop a Guide to Identification of Follicular Atresia Using Ultrasonography in Pallid Sturgeon. The Fellow will participate in the final presentation given to the Basin-wide Pallid Sturgeon Propagation Committee.

The Fellow will receive training and experience in the care of fishes, reproductive physiology of fishes, and assessment of tools used to assign sex and stage of maturity in our threatened and endangered aquatic species, though the Fellow will be working directly with the endangered pallid sturgeon. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in Biological Science or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Project will take place in a laboratory as well as a wet laboratory. Valid driver’s license and the ability to lift and carry 50 lbs.

Desired Characteristics: Interpersonal communication, teamwork, technical writing, and eagerness to learn.

Human-Grizzly Bear Conflict Reduction Coordinator (Montana)

Project type: This field project will transition to telework or remote work if required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location:  This is project is based out of Region 6, Billings, MT RAC Office.

Housing: Supported (one time, $3000 housing stipend).

Project Background: As a Fellow with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement in Montana you will be working with highly trained and experienced special agents and biologists with the USFWS, state conservation officers, biologists and managers, tribal conservation officers and officials, and citizen committee members to help solve a challenging problem involving human-grizzly bear conflicts. 

Project Duties: The Fellowship will provide opportunity to travel to three different states to obtain information critical to this project and interact with numerous conservation minded individuals.  The selected Fellow will: 1) work independently while reviewing critical information, 2) critically assess data, and 3) identify previously unidentified actions/causes/behaviors/circumstances and/or commonalities involved in human-grizzly bear conflicts.  The Fellow will consolidate the data and create a written recommendation report on how to appropriately address these newly identified actions/causes/behaviors/circumstances and/or commonalities to help reduce and/or eliminate future human-grizzly bear conflicts.  There will be opportunity for the Fellow to accompany USFWS agents and biologists and state and tribal conservation officers and biologists to the safe scenes where human-grizzly bear conflicts have occurred to get first-hand experience with a variety of different conflicts. The Fellow may need to be able hike while carrying heavy equipment in adverse weather conditions in remote, rugged terrain.  The project will require you to tap into critical thinking, problem solving, interpersonal skills and technical writing.  At the finish of this project, the Fellow will present their recommendations on based on their findings. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences, law enforcement/criminal justice, education/outreach, social sciences/humanities, communications/marketing, Geographic Information Sciences, or other related fields.

Requirements/Working Conditions:  Valid driver’s license, ability to lift/carry up to 50 pounds, ability to conduct field work potentially involving hiking and carrying equipment, ability to work in various weather conditions and stomach various degrees of animal decomposition.  Carry and deploy bear spray and be certified in basic first aid and CPR.

Desired Characteristics:  Teamwork, partnership building, interpersonal skills, cross-cultural communication and technical writing skills, public speaking, and leadership roles.

Investigate Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail on Benton Lake NWR (Great Falls)

Project Type: This field project will be cancelled if telework or remote work is required by USFWS or DOI leadership.

Location: Legacy Region 6, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Great Falls, Montana

Housing: Supported (Housing available at duty station, rent free)

Project Background: Benton Lake NWR is located eight miles north of Great Falls, MT, a city of 60,000 located in west central Montana at the confluence of the Missouri and Sun Rivers. The 12,383-acre Refuge was established in 1929 as a “Refuge and Breeding Ground for Birds.” The 6,000-acre main marsh has been subdivided into eight separate management units through a series of dikes and water control structures. A water delivery system was constructed in the late 1950’s which allows pumped water to reach the Refuge from Muddy Creek some 15 miles west of the Refuge. In the past twenty years, Garrison Creeping Meadow Foxtail, a forage species introduced from Eurasia, has become one of the dominant plant species in Refuge wetlands and continues to expand into large monotypic stands. Native species such as alkali bulrush and smartweed have been significantly reduced in the Refuge marsh units. 

Project Duties: The Fellow will investigate methods to effectively manage Garrison foxtail on the Refuge and draft management recommendations for Refuge staff. Work assignments will include: 1) create a list of refuge units prioritized by GFC abundance. 2) review current Refuge data on GCF Compile data on GCF and known control measures, 3) conduct a literature review for potential Garrison control methods and list of sources reviewed and used, and 4) summarize Technical Recommendations. The Fellow will work with Refuge staff and visit other area Refuges to discuss mitigation strategies, consult with  local Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA) and Bureau of Land Management staff, and work with biology and botany staff at local colleges and universities. At the end of the summer, the Fellow will deliver a final report and present on their work to Refuge staff and partners. 

Minimum Education Level and Desired Degree Areas: Undergraduate rising seniors and seniors who are pursuing a degree in biological sciences or other closely related field.

Working Conditions/Requirements: Valid Driver’s License and an ability to drive federal vehicles, Ability to conduct field work involving hiking and carrying equipment, Ability to lift/carry 50 lbs. required.

Desired Characteristics: Skills in: Interpersonal communication, Cross-Cultural communication skills, Project Management experience, Leadership roles (school, extracurricular, etc.), Teamwork, and Technical Writing.